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Architecture, Design, and Art Library provides remote services during building closure

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The College of Architecture and Design Building is now closed to students and visitors, so the Architecture, Design, and Art Library will provide services remotely until the building reopens.

BORROWING
All library materials loaned to students, adjunct faculty members, and external borrowers have already been renewed through 5/31. All library materials loaned to full-time faculty members will be automatically renewed in April, as usual

Materials may be returned to the  drop box located in front of the M.D. Anderson Library.

COLLECTION SERVICES

Our primary video streaming service, Kanopy, is currently slow because of its unusually high usage, but they are working to restore service. We also have other platforms that stream video. Academic Video Online, AVON, and Credo’s Complete Core Collection may have content you can use. See list at https://guides.lib.uh.edu/az.php?t=23740

Content in electronic databases (articles, maps, materials, reference materials) are available via links on the library website.

RESEARCH SERVICES

The library staff will continue to provide reference and research consultations via email or phone. You may contact them directly, or by using the department email, archlib@uh.edu.

Online research guides are available at guides.libraries.uh.edu.  Search for these guides:
• Architecture resources
• Art resources
• Industrial design
• Online information literacy lessons
• Research instruction videos

Please know that we are already working with a smaller than usual staff. We can only provide scanning and consultation services between 8-5 on weekdays, at this time.

New Building Houston recordings online

General Announcements, New Resource, New Service

The Architecture, Design and Art Library has developed an online collection of interviews called Building Houston, which documents the oral history of Houston’s built environment, as told by the people who impacted it.  Architects, developers, planners, scholars, philanthropists, and community leaders discuss their work and its relationship to Houston’s urban fabric in this online collection.  Each subject is interviewed by a scholar or colleague who frames the discussion and provides context.  Ten recordings made earlier this year are now available in the UH Libraries’ audio/video repository.  Click on the link to see interviews with Leslie K. Elkins, Natalye Appel, James B. Thomas and others.

Translate library’s website into multiple languages

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By selecting a language from the drop down menu at the bottom of the Architecture, Design, and Art Library’s page, users can now translate this site into 80 different languages.

Open house for new and early career instructors

General Announcements, New Resource, New Service, Special Event or Display

Student Art Exhibit opening August 3rd

General Announcements, Special Event or Display

The William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library is pleased to present Play and Process by student artist Felicia Leyva. The opening reception will be held on Friday, August 3, with light refreshments. The exhibit will be on display through October, and is free and open to the public.

Leyva is a sculpture BFA student at the University of Houston. While she has experimented with several mediums, her work mainly focuses on her increasing interest in fiber arts. Known for her fun and colorful style, she enjoys bringing new life to everyday soft materials like yarn, foam, and felt. Her work has been exhibited at Blaffer Art Museum’s Student Exhibition and UH Biannual Art Show on campus grounds. As she continues her creative journey, she hopes to further blur the line between craft and fine art.

Artist’s statement:

I make art because I can’t imagine myself doing anything else. It’s a great part of who I am. When I go days without making something, I feel almost sick and weighed down. The process of making art is my way of clearing out my mind and letting go of frustrations. Art is very therapeutic and as a person who internalizes things, I find much relief in it.

I’m geared towards making playful, lighthearted art because it reminds me of easier times as a child. I feel as though somewhere down the line of growing up, my life picked up a lot of anger and pain. I’ve been trying to cancel out these negative feelings with bright, colorful, artworks. I think I’m trying to create a fun and beautiful world to live in. One that makes myself and others feel happy.

I was introduced to the world of fiber arts about a year ago and fell in love with it. Fibers are the best medium for producing inviting, comforting textures. There is something magical about creating work that entices others to reach out and touch them. I have never minded if people touch my work. I actually encourage it because then you are no longer simply viewing but experiencing the piece. Through touch, I believe that you can connect with my artwork and ultimately, myself.

New Digital Resource on Houston’s Riverside Terrace

General Announcements, New Resource

A newly digitized and accessible collection focusing on Houston’s Riverside Terrace has been added to the UH Libraries Audio/Video Repository.

The collection features raw footage captured for the production of the 1987 documentary This Is Our Home, It Is Not For Sale by Jon Schwartz. The searchable and viewable clips comprise over 110 interviews with former residents, city council members, former University of Houston faculty, and other community leaders discussing the evolution of Riverside Terrace amid urban development, expansion of neighboring institutions, and changes in demographics during the 1950s and 60s. The firsthand perspectives of interviewees collectively provide a fascinating and honest narrative about race and real estate in mid-century Houston.

The complete documentary is available to watch in the UH Special Collections Reading Room. In addition, the papers of filmmaker Jon Schwartz are preserved and accessible in the Reading Room. This collection covers the full scope of records related to the production of the documentary. Interviews from the collection were digitized with the generous support of an Institute of Museum and Library Services TexTreasures grant, administered by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Student Artwork Archived in the Digital Library

General Announcements, New Resource, Special Event or Display

The William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design, and Art Library offers art and design students the opportunity to exhibit their work inside its facility, giving them experience installing work in a public space, as well as the chance to explore the relationship between their work and the library’s materials.  Work exhibited in the Architecture and Art Library during the Fall Semester can be viewed in the UH Digital Library.  Use the links below to see each artist’s work.

Leah Bydalek

Angel Castelan

Jackelyn Cordova

Alton DuLaney

Isaac Farley

 

Students in the Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture and Design and the School of Art may propose to exhibit their work using our online form.

The Architecture, Design and Art Library will close during graduation

General Announcements

The Architecture, Design, and Art Library will close from 2 pm on Friday, May 11th, until the College of Architecture and Design’s graduation has commenced, approximately 90 minutes.

Architectural sketches in the UH Digital Library

General Announcements, New Resource, Special Event or Display

Sketches Abroad has been digitized for the UH Digital Library.  The oversized portfolio features sketches made by Julius A. Schweinfurth during a nine month tour Spain, Italy, France, and the South Kensington Museum in 1886.  Mr. Schweinfurth earned a Rotch Travelling Fellowship from the Boston Society of Architects, which allowed him to travel and publish his sketches. He later became chief designer at Peabody and Sterns, one of the most prominent American firms of the late nineteenth century, before launching his own firm in 1895.  His notable works include several dormitories at Wellesley College and the Bradley Chapel at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn, NY.  He and his family endowed the Schweinfurth Art Center, which continues to operate in Auburn.

This rare portfolio is part of the William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design and Art Library’s Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room collection.  Contact Catherine Essinger at cwessinger@uh.edu to schedule a time to view this or other rare books on art and design.

Installation by School of Art alumnus

General Announcements, Special Event or Display

An installation of prints and multimedia artwork by UH alumnus Lisa Marie Kress is on view on the William R. Jenkins Architecture, Design and Art Library’s upper mezzanine through May 2018.  Ms. Kress, currently an instructor at the University of Houston-Downtown, earned her MFA from the UH School of Art in 2001.

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