Glass Mountain

Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 – 5:30pm6:30pm
Location: 
Honors College Commons, 2nd Floor, M.D. Anderson Library

About the Reading

The April 16th Poetry & Prose reading will feature creative writers who have work featured in the forthcoming issue of the UH Undergraduate literary journal, Glass Mountain: Katie Laitkep, Steven Tea, Cassia Glass, and B. Tacconi. See brief reader biographies below.

For more information about UH’s undergraduate literary journal, check out the Glass Mountain website.

The reading is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you at our final reading of the season.

Reader’s Bios

Katie Laitkep is currently an English major, a hospital teacher, and a Lyme patient, blogging her journey through medical treatment at www.apatientprocess.com. In 2013, her words and website caught the attention of the founder of Clement Arts, and she joined their team of writers to help raise support for local adoptions. Katie is expected to graduate from the University of Houston’s creative writing program in the fall of 2014.

B.Tacconi will be graduating this May with a B.A in Creative Writing. She was the runner up in Glass Mountain’s Poetry and Prose Contest judged by Tony Hoagland and the 2013 recipient of the Peter K. Hixson Award. Her works have appeared or are forthcoming in Glass Mountain, Houston & Nomadic Voices, The Oklahoma Review, and The Concho River Review. When she is not busy avoiding the suburbs you can find her at home playing hide and seek with her turtle.

Steven Tea is a junior Creative Writing student at UH. He won the Robertson Prize for Poetry last year and received honorable mention in Glass Mountain’s recent Poetry and Prose contest. He likes his dog Bobo and sometimes dreams about being a full moon.

Cassia Glass lives in Spring, TX, with her husband and two kids. “Green Island” was her workshop piece at the 2013 Boldface conference and was awarded the Robertson Prize.

Non-Fiction Writers

Event Date:
Wednesday, February 12, 2014 – 5:30pm6:30pm
Location: 
Honors College Commons, 2nd Floor, M.D. Anderson Library

About the Reading

The February 12th Poetry & Prose reading will feature UH Creative Writing Program Faculty Peter Turchi and Mat Johnson, and alum Lacy Johnson.

The reading is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you there!

Reader’s Bios

Peter Turchi is the author of five books and the co-editor of three anthologies. His books include Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as CartographerSuburban Journals: The Sketchbooks, Drawings, and Prints of Charles Ritchie, in collaboration with the artist; a novel, The Girls Next Door; a collection of stories, Magician; and The Pirate Prince, co-written with Cape Cod treasure hunter Barry Clifford, about Clifford’s discovery of the pirate ship Whydah. His next book, A Muse and A Maze: Writing, as Puzzle, Mystery, and Magic will be out in September. His short story “Night, Truck, Two Lights Burning,” listed as one of 100 Notable Stories of 2002 by the editors of Best American Short Stories and one of 15 Recommended Stories by the jury for the O. Henry Prize Stories, has been published in Arabic and, in English, combined with images by Charles Ritchie, in a limited edition artist’s book. He has also co-edited, with Andrea Barrett, A Kite in the WindFiction Writers on Their CraftThe Story Behind the Story: 26 Stories by Contemporary Writers and How They Work and, with Charles Baxter, Bringing the Devil to His Knees: The Craft of Fiction and the Writing Life.

Peter Turchi’s stories have appeared in Ploughshares, Story, The Alaska Quarterly Review, Puerto del Sol, and The Colorado Review, among other journals. He has received Washington College’s Sophie Kerr Prize, an Illinois Arts Council Literary Award, North Carolina’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.

Born in Baltimore, he earned his BA at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland, and his MFA at the University of Arizona. He has taught at Northwestern University and Appalachian State University, has been on the faculty of the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, and served as a Visiting Professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston. From 1993 through 2008 he directed The MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina.

Lacy M. Johnson is the author of THE OTHER SIDE, forthcoming from Tin House Books (2014), Trespasses: A Memoir (University of Iowa Press, 2012), and she is co-artistic director of the forthcoming multimedia project [the invisible city] (April, 2014). She worked as a cashier at WalMart, sold steaks door-to-door, and puppeteered with a traveling children’s museum before earning a PhD from University of Houston’s Creative Writing Program. She has been awarded grants and fellowships from the Houston Arts Alliance, the Sustainable Arts Foundation, Kansas Arts Commission (may it rest in peace), the Mitchell Center for the Arts, Inprint, and Millay Colony for the Arts. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Tin House, The Racial Imaginary (Fence Books, 2014), Fourth Genre, Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013), Creative Nonfiction, Sentence, TriQuarterly Online, Memoir Journal, Gulf Coast, and elsewhere. She is currently Director of Academic Initiatives at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts at University of Houston, where she teaches interdisciplinary art.

Mat Johnson is a novelist who sometimes writes other things.

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Mat Johnson grew up in the Germantown and Mount Airy sections of the city. He is the author of the novels PymDrop, and Hunting in Harlem, the nonfiction novella The Great Negro Plot, and the comic books Incognegro and Dark Rain. He is a recipient of the United States Artist James Baldwin FellowshipThe Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection, and the John Dos Passos Prize for Literature.

Mat Johnson is a faculty member at the University of Houston Creative Writing Program.

Shrimp Boat Project

Event Date: 
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 – 5:30pm6:30pm
Location:
Honors College Commons, 2nd Floor, M.D. Anderson Library

About the Reading

The November 6th Poetry & Prose event presents readers from Ecopoetics on the Gulf (associated with Shrimp Boat Projects), a creative writing workshop that combines ecological experiences on the Gulf of Mexico, multimedia art projects, and poetry. Planting cord grass, kayaking, observing bird migrations, and creating art onsite are part of the “immersion.” A working shrimp boat serves as the base for explorations of the marshes, bays, and beaches of the Galveston Bay Estuary. Supported by the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts, the Creative Writing Program, and the Department of English, the course is offered every two years.

Find brief reader biographies below.

The reading is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you there!

Reader’s Bios

Layla Benitez-James is a third-year MFA candidate in poetry, was born and raised in Texas, and loves its shorebirds.

Patrick Clement James, a graduate of the Manhattan School of Music, is currently an MFA candidate at UH.

Dana Kroos received an MFA in ceramic sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2005 and is currently working toward a PhD in fiction.

Caitlin Maling is a West Australian poet whose first book, Conversations I’ve Never Had, will be published by Fremantle Press.

Bryan Owens is an MFA candidate in poetry at UH and has had work appear in Nano Fiction, amphibi.us, The Centrifugal Eye, and San Pedro River Review.

Katie Condon is a second-year MFA candidate in poetry who misses the East Coast very much, but loves the Gulf Coast, too.

Originally from Tennessee, Nancy K. Pearson is a second-year MFA candidate in nonfiction at UH.

Martha Serpas, a poet from Cajun Louisiana, teaches in the Creative Writing Program at UH and is a hospital chaplain.

Michael Berryhill, a poet and journalist, is chair of the journalism department at Texas Southern University in Houston.

Creative Writing Program

Event Date: 
Wednesday, October 9, 2013 – 5:30pm6:30pm
Location: 
Honors College Commons, 2nd Floor, M.D. Anderson Library

About the Reading

The October 9th Poetry & Prose reading will feature new MFA and PhD students in the UH Creative Writing Program: Martin Rock, Adrienne Perry, Matthew Salesses, and Rhianna Brandt.

The reading is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you at our first reading of this academic year.

Reader’s Bios

Martin Rock‘s poems have appeared in Black Warrior Review, Bateau, Conduit, Salamander, Best New Poets 2012, and other journals. His recent chapbook from Brooklyn Arts Press, Dear Mark, is a response to the work of Mark Rothko and a previous chapbook, Fish, You Bird, was published by Pilot in 2010. He is editor in chief of the online journal of poetry, art, and translation, Loaded Bicycle, and is an assistant poetry editor for Gulf Coast. He holds degrees from Florida State University and NYU, and is the recipient of fellowships from the Starworks Foundation, InPrint, and the Port Townsend Writers Conference.

Matthew Salesses is the author of a novel, I’m Not Saying, I’m Just Saying, a novella, The Last Repatriate, and two chapbooks. He is the Fiction Editor and a Contributing Writer for The Good Men Project. He has also written for The New York Times, NPR, The Rumpus, Glimmer Train, American Short Fiction, and others. His latest project is a couple of ebooks forthcoming from Thought Catalog Books.

Adrienne Perry grew up in Cheyenne, Wyoming, the daughter of a rolling stone from Southern California and a mother whose family homesteaded outside of Gillette. In past lives, Adrienne has worked as a reference librarian, a chambermaid, a college counselor, an admissions officer, and an au pair. A graduate of Hampshire College and the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers, Adrienne is also a Kimbilio Fellow.

Rhianna Brandt is from Hays, North Carolina and has studied creative writing at Salem College and the University of Houston.

Undergraduate Creative Writing Students

Event Date:
Wednesday, April 17, 2013 – 5:30pm7:00pm
Location: 
Honors College Commons, MD Anderson Library

 

The April 17th Poetry & Prose reading will feature creative writers who have work featured in the forthcoming issue of the UH Undergraduate literary journal, Glass Mountain: Carolyn Adams, Kathryn Diaz, Douglas Knudsen, Heather Pedoto, Amanda Scott, and B. Tacconi. See brief reader biographies below.

For more information about UH’s undergraduate literary journal, check out the Glass Mountain website. Issues of Glass Mountain will be available for sale at the reading.

The reading is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. We look forward to seeing you at our final reading of the season.

Carolyn Adams’ poetry and art have appeared in Caveat Lector, The Alembic, San Pedro River Review, Clare Literary Journal, and Common Ground Review, among others. She has authored the chapbooks Beautiful Strangers (Lily Press, 2006), What Do You See? (Right Hand Pointing, 2007), and An Ocean of Names (Red Shoe Press, 2011).  She has also been nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Kathryn Diaz is currently a student at the University of Houston pursuing a degree in creative writing. She has lived in Houston her whole life. Her work has previously appeared in Thinkbox and Metamorphoses.

Douglas Knudsen is a senior at University of Houston majoring in English – Creative Writing. His work has recently appeared in Widener University’s The Blue Route. When not writing poetry or at school, he karaokes.

Heather Pedoto is not an enemy to all sea monsters; she is a writer, and the only sea monsters she has offended have been strictly accidental. She’s been published before in Glass Mountain, and will be appearing in Houston & Nomadic Voices Magazine as well. She has had several plays performed, none of them starring sea monsters.

Amanda Scott is an Assistant Fiction Editor for Glass Mountain. She firmly believes that metaphor and medicine are the same thing. It’s a scientific fact.

B. Tacconi is a backseat-snatcher at the University of Houston who studies January’s rain and the psychology behind Warped Tour bodysuits.