UH Libraries News http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu Fri, 19 Sep 2014 15:54:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Lukasek and Houston Talk About LGBTQI Books http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/19/lukasek-and-houston-talk-about-lgbtqi-books/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/19/lukasek-and-houston-talk-about-lgbtqi-books/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 17:45:18 +0000 Julie Grob http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4281 Edward Lukasek, donor of the Edward Lukasek Gay Studies Collection

Edward Lukasek, donor of the Edward Lukasek Gay Studies Collection

Dr. Natalie Houston, Associate Professor in the English Dept. at UH

Dr. Natalie Houston, Associate Professor in the English Dept. at UH

On Tuesday, September 16th, Special Collections welcomed Edward Lukasek and Dr. Natalie Houston for a panel discussion titled “Life with Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Literature.” Cosponsored by the UH Libraries and the LGBT Resource Center, the event was intended to complement the exhibit LGBTQI Literature: Celebrated Classics and Contemporary Works, which closes on Friday, September 26th.

A rapt audience of faculty, librarians, staff, and visitors enjoyed learning about the role that books played in the lives of the two panelists – Edward Lukasek, a book collector whose private collection was donated to the UH Libraries as the Edward Lukasek Gay Studies Collection, and Natalie Houston, an Associate Professor in the English Department at UH who has taught a number of courses on LGBT literature.

Lukasek described collecting books at his favorite thrift shop while living in the Castro district of San Francisco for 17 years. Asked to recommend his favorite work of LGBTQI literature, he chose the trilogy of autobiographical novels by Edmund White: A Boy’s Own Story, The Beautiful Room is Empty, and The Farewell Symphony. He praised White’s ability to put the reader in the moment, and said that he appreciated reading about the experiences of a gay man from an earlier generation. Lukasek also described the flowering of literature that followed the early years of the AIDS epidemic, recommending Heaven’s Coast by Mark Doty as a particularly poignant memoir.

Houston has always been a voracious reader. While her major field of interest is Victorian literature, she enjoyed studying with queer studies pioneer Eve Sedgwick as a PhD student at Duke. Arguing that it was unfair to ask an English professor to pick only one favorite LGBTQI book, Houston recommended three favorite authors and works – Michael Cunningham’s A Home at the End of the World, a beautifully written novel about friendship; Carol Anshaw’s Aquamarine, the story of a woman’s three possible lives; and Emma Donoghue’s Hood, which centers on the death of the protagonist’s lover. Houston also talked about her rewarding experiences teaching LGBT literature to UH students.

The panel discussion made for a very special conversation; please watch this space for video from the event.

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Alley Theatre Exhibit Spotlights Nina Vance http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/19/alley-theatre-exhibit-spotlights-nina-vance/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/19/alley-theatre-exhibit-spotlights-nina-vance/#comments Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:47:09 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2609 A new exhibit at the University of Houston Libraries illuminates the life of visionary Alley Theatre founder Nina Vance, and provides a contextual history of the theatre’s rise to prominence.

In 1947, Vance mailed 214 penny postcards bearing the question, “Do you want a new theater for Houston?” Soon, the Alley Theatre was born.

Nina Vance | Photo from the Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers, UH Special Collections

Nina Vance | Photo from the Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers, UH Special Collections

From the exhibit:

From its modest beginnings in a dance studio on Main Street, to a converted fan factory on Berry Avenue, to a state-of-the-art building downtown, the road to becoming the nationally recognized theatre it is today was paved with talent, generosity, and hard work. The woman behind it all remained the same, Nina Vance. As the theatre’s founder and artistic director for more than thirty years, Vance was a guiding force for the theatre and worked tirelessly to see it become a Houston institution.

The exhibit features programs, photographs, articles, correspondence, and other memorabilia from the UH Special Collections Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers.

Visitors are invited to view the exhibit at the MD Anderson Library starting October 25, 2014 through May 8, 2015. The exhibit opens concurrently with the 100th anniversary of Vance’s birth.

For more information, contact Catherine Essinger 713-743-2337, and Stacey Lavender, 713-743-9605.

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Agnes Arnold Hall: Some Problems http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/18/agnes-arnold-hall-some-problems/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/18/agnes-arnold-hall-some-problems/#comments Thu, 18 Sep 2014 09:59:50 +0000 Dr. Stephen James http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4252  

Kenneth E. Bentsen, Agnes Arnold Hall (1968), south elevation

Kenneth E. Bentsen, Agnes Arnold Hall (1968), south elevation (Photo Eric E. Johnson, by permission)

In recent posts I expressed admiration for the formal aspects of Agnes Arnold Hall, but anyone who works in this building knows that it has some problems.  Most of these problems stem from a single design flaw—the architect’s decision to open the building to the outside, much like a garden apartment or a motel. Thus the lobby and corridor areas have but modest protection from the elements.  This is a viable design strategy only in Hawaii and other places with a balmy climate.

Wind gusts blew through the open corridors at the upper levels of the building with such force that the university had to close the north-facing openings with glass. This was only a partial fix, and students changing classes in the winter still feel the cold as soon as they step outside the classroom.

Agnes Arnold Hall, open corridor at upper level, c. 1972. In background PGH and Hilton Hotel are under construction. (Photo Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

Agnes Arnold Hall, open corridor at upper level, c. 1972. In background M.D. Anderson Library has original facade while PGH and Hilton Hotel buildings are under construction. (Photo Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

Originally, visitors to Agnes Arnold Hall moved through the lower levels on escalators. Because of their many moving parts, escalators are maintenance headaches even in the controlled conditions of a shopping mall.  When they were exposed to humid outdoor conditions as they were in this building, they didn’t last very long.  Eventually, the university got tired of fixing them and replaced them with stairs.

Agnes Arnold Hall, lobby  looking up at escalators from basement level, c. 1972 (Photo Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

Agnes Arnold Hall, lobby looking up at escalators from basement level, c. 1972 (Photo Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

Agnes Arnold Hall is entered from a bridge over the basement courtyard.

Agnes Arnold Hall, view of basement courtyard spanned by entry bridge, c. 1972. (Photo Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The open courtyard at the basement level was a brilliant idea and looked great, but it resembled a bathtub during heavy rains.  Flooding during Tropical Storm Allison (2001) forced the university to install mechanical floodgates at the entrance to this lower level.

Agnes Arnold Hall may have so many problems because Kenneth Bentsen was such a good designer. If you build the same thing over and over again, you learn by experience what works and what doesn’t work.  That’s why dull, boring buildings seem to have the fewest problems.  But within their profession, architects are encouraged to be innovative, to be different, to push the envelope with their designs.

When you do something different, by definition you don’t have much experience with how it will work in practice.  That’s why the most architecturally significant buildings often have the most problems in daily use. Some new ideas are not good ideas, but you don’t know that until you try them.

We reward architects who take risks because that’s how the discipline of architecture advances.  At least that’s the theory.  So architects will continue to admire buildings like Agnes Arnold Hall and their users will continue to loathe them.  We invite you to continue your study with the Architecture & Planning collections at the University of Houston Special Collections.

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New Databases at UH Libraries http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/17/new-databases-at-uh-libraries/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/17/new-databases-at-uh-libraries/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:11:33 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2607 The following databases are now available from the University of Houston Libraries:

Alt-HealthWatch
A full-text database of periodicals, peer-reviewed journals, academic and professional publications, magazines, consumer newsletters and newspapers, research reports, and association newsletters focused on contemporary, alternative and integrated approaches to health care and wellness.

American Indian Histories and Cultures
A wide-ranging digital resource presenting a unique insight into interactions between American Indians and Europeans from their earliest contact, continuing through the turbulence of the American Civil War, the on-going repercussions of government legislation, right up to the civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century. This resource contains material from the Newberry Library’s extensive Edward E. Ayer Collection.

American West
Original manuscripts, maps, ephemeral material, and rare printed sources from the Graff Collection about the American West, including tales of frontier life, Native Americans, vigilantes, and outlaws, and the growth of urban centers and environmental impact of westward expansion and of life in the borderlands.

Global Commodities
This resource brings together manuscript, printed and visual primary source materials for the study of global commodities in world history. The commodities featured in this resource have been transported, exchanged and consumed around the world for hundreds of years. They helped transform societies, global trading operations, habits of consumption and social practices.

Health Source, Consumer Edition
Provides consumer oriented information on many health topics including the medical sciences, food sciences and nutrition, childcare, adult health, behavioral health, cardiology, drug and medication information, pediatric health, senior health, women’s health, and sports medicine.

Literary Reference Center
This full-text database provides a spectrum of information on authors and their works across literary disciplines and time frames to give scholars, professors, and researchers a foundation of literary reference works to meet their research needs.

Natural and Alternative Treatments
Natural & Alternative Treatments contains detailed information on almost 200 different conditions and the conventional and natural treatments used to treat them, over 300 herbs and supplements, plus drug-herb and drug-supplement interactions for more than 90 drug categories.

Project Euclid: Mathematics and Statistics Online
Project Euclid is a joint effort by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press; this not-for-profit online publishing service provides access to journals, monographs, and conference proceedings in the fields of theoretical and applied mathematics and statistics.

ProQuest Congressional Publications
Provides users with access to a comprehensive collection of historic and current congressional information.

For database assistance, visit Electronic Resources Help.

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Fall 2014 Grad Student Mixer http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/16/fall-2014-grad-student-mixer/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/16/fall-2014-grad-student-mixer/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 13:42:33 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2600 University of Houston graduate students are invited to the Fall 2014 Graduate Student Mixer, hosted by UH Libraries.

UH graduate students are invited to the Grad Student Mixer on October 7.

UH graduate students are invited to the Grad Student Mixer on October 7.

The event serves as an opportunity for graduate students to network with one another, and allows them to meet subject librarians in a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

Date: Tuesday, October 7
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Rockwell Pavilion, second floor of MD Anderson Library

NOTE: Must be 21 to consume alcohol. IDs will be checked at the door.

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UH Libraries Welcomes Resource Description Coordinator http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/16/uh-libraries-welcomes-resource-description-coordinator/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/16/uh-libraries-welcomes-resource-description-coordinator/#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:18:52 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2594 The University of Houston Libraries provides a vast array of resources that supplement teaching, learning, and research. Resources, including both physical and electronic materials, are cataloged and described using standards and processes that optimize accessibility to users.

Hayley Moreno joins the UH Libraries as the new resource description coordinator, managing cataloging workflow to make materials more accessible.

Hayley Moreno joins the UH Libraries as the new resource description coordinator, managing cataloging workflow to make materials more accessible.

UH Libraries recently welcomed Hayley Moreno as its new Resource Description Coordinator. In this role, Moreno will manage cataloging workflow for increased efficiency and collaboration with Metadata and Digitization Services. Her goal is to make UH Libraries’ materials more accessible, using the standard and schema, Resource Description and Access (RDA).

Cataloging is the comprehensive creation of bibliographic data that enables library users to find the resources they seek; whether it’s a book, database, journal or non-print media. Contemporary cataloging requires an ever-evolving skill set among librarians which reflects new trends and standards. For instance, the term resource description refers to a newer protocol for the formulation of bibliographic data.

As such, Moreno sees an interesting future for resource description. “The schemas that we use are changing,” she said. “We’re moving towards linked data, which requires librarians to use web technologies like URIs, HTTP and RDF.”

Moreno noted that the reason for the shift in the ways libraries perform resource description is because some information is still not widely accessible. “Resources in a library’s catalog may not be retrievable when using web search engines,” Moreno said. “Traditional bibliographic description limits discoverability of library resources on the web.”

Traditional bibliographic schema used in cataloging is phasing out as more libraries adopt new schemas that find relevant information on the web by connecting data structures and placing previously hidden resources into the hands (and screens) of users.

Libraries and institutions that incorporate new coding protocols will strengthen their ability to connect with one another’s data structures and provide more access to materials, giving library users results similar to what they experience with search engine results.

“Changing the way we describe things – creating structured data, and generating relationships from it – that’s the framework behind the idea of finding a resource from anywhere on the web,” Moreno said.

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National Hispanic American Heritage Month 2014 http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/15/national-hispanic-american-heritage-month-2014/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/15/national-hispanic-american-heritage-month-2014/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:08:43 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4242 petition from the Barefoot Monks to Philip V, King of Spain (from the Mexico Documents Collection)

petition from the Barefoot Monks to Philip V, King of Spain (1739, from the Mexico Documents Collection)

Today marks the kickoff of National Hispanic American Heritage Month 2014.

From September 15 through October 15, we celebrate the history, culture, and contributions of Americans whose ancestry derives from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.  The month, in actuality a 30-day period spanning two months, owes its unorthodox time frame to its origins (originally a week-long observation started under President Lyndon B. Johnson, it was expanded to a month under President Ronald Reagan) and to historical convenience (the first days coincide with the independence celebrations of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, and Chile and the final days encompass Columbus Day or Día de la Raza).  During this time, the Library of Congress in partnership with a number of archives, repositories, and various organizations sponsor exhibits and collections dedicated to telling the story of Hispanic American history.

Here at the University of Houston Special Collections, we celebrate the opportunity to be part of that collective voice as we make available for study our Hispanic Collections.  Rich with research potential and always in-demand from scholars, highlights from the collections include the Alonso S. Perales Papers (diplomat, civil-rights lawyer, and one of the founders of LULAC), the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers (educator and founder of La Cruz Blanca), and the Mexico Documents Collection (holding manuscript materials dating as far back as 1570).  A collection that should increase in its value to researchers over the years are the sizable Arte Público Press Records (the oldest and largest Latino publishing house in the U.S., based here at the University of Houston) and materials related to their award-winning work with the Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project.

Leonor and ladies of Cruz Blanca 1st brigade

Leonor and ladies of Cruz Blanca 1st brigade (Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers and also available in our Digital Library)

Over the next month we will take a closer look at the impact of these collections on scholarship related to Hispanic American history.  We encourage you, in your own observations over the next month and all year long, to visit UH Special Collections and experience the archives holding that rich history.

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Life With Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Literature http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/10/life-with-books-collecting-reading-and-teaching-lgbtqi-literature/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/10/life-with-books-collecting-reading-and-teaching-lgbtqi-literature/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 14:05:24 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4228 Life with Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Lierature — Tuesday, September 16th at 4pm — Evans Room, Special Collections, MD Anderson Library 2nd Floor

Life with Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Lierature — Tuesday, September 16th at 4pm — Evans Room, Special Collections, MD Anderson Library 2nd Floor

On Tuesday, September 16th at 4:00 p.m., the University of Houston Special Collections will host an event sponsored by the University of Houston Libraries and the University of Houston LGBT Resource Center.  “Life With Books:  Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Literature” will feature talks from book collector Edward Lukasek, the generous donor of the Edward Lukasek Book Collection, and Dr. Natalie Houston of the UH English Department and Co-Director for the Periodical Poetry Index.

“Life With Books…” will take place in the Evans Room of Special Collections on the second floor of the M.D. Anderson Library and will be followed by a reception.  Intended to serve as a complement to “LGBTQI Literature: Celebrated Classics and Contemporary Works,” currently on exhibition on the first floor of the M.D. Anderson Library, this panel discussion was scheduled for the last weeks of the exhibit’s run to allow increased opportunities for students to attend.  Students of all disciplines, interested in the history and study of LGBTQI literature, are encouraged to attend this unique opportunity to meet and hear from our distinguished panelists.  For more information, see the attached poster and we look forward to seeing everyone on Tuesday!

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Celebrating 15 Years of Poetry and Prose at UH http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/10/celebrating-15-years-of-poetry-and-prose-at-uh/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/10/celebrating-15-years-of-poetry-and-prose-at-uh/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 06:46:12 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2585

The 2014-2015 season of Poetry and Prose: Creative Writers at the University of Houston kicks off on September 17.

University of Houston students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to the 2014-2015 season of Poetry and Prose: Creative Writers at the University of Houston.

The series, now in its 15th year, kicks off on September 17 and will feature new MFA and PhD students in the UH Creative Writing Program.

Erika Brown, Will Burns, Samuel Dinger, Jonathan Meyer, Luisa Muradyan and Georgia Pearle are scheduled to read selected works of poetry and fiction.

All readings are held in the Honors College Commons in the MD Anderson Library and begin at 5:30 p.m. Readings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

The next reading is scheduled for October 15, featuring faculty poets.

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Select Photos of the Cruiser Houston Collection Now Available in the Digital Library http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/08/select-photos-of-the-cruiser-houston-collection-now-available-in-the-digital-library/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/08/select-photos-of-the-cruiser-houston-collection-now-available-in-the-digital-library/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 15:24:47 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4216 Naming campaign, Western Union storefront

Naming campaign, Western Union storefront (1927) / from the USS Houston (CA-30) Photographs / (sign in window reads, “if you want a new cruiser named ‘U.S.S. Houston’ telegraph your congressman or the Secretary of the Navy”)

The recent publication of the USS Houston (CA-30) Photographs, adding to the growing Military History Collections at our Digital Library, marks another major milestone and means even more research potential for remote scholars unable to visit our rich USS Houston physical archives and materials.

Pulled from the photographs of the Cruiser Houston Collection, this new digital collection highlights the history of the heavy cruiser and her crew–the survivors, prisoners of war, and those who gave all.  The flagship of the Asiatic Fleet during World War II, the Houston fought in the Battle of the Java Sea and to her bitter end at the Battle of Sunda Strait, sinking just after midnight as February turned into March, 1942.  Highlights in the collection date back to the naming campaign that gave her our city’s name, include documentation of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s affinity for the Houston as his vessel of choice for sea voyages and deep sea diversions during his presidency, show haunting scenes from those infamous POW camps, and testify to the resolve of 1,000 “Houston Volunteers” who answered the call sent out by the sinking of the Houston.

Evacuation of POWs, Rat Buri, Thailand ([1945])

Evacuation of POWs, Rat Buri, Thailand [1945] / from the USS Houston (CA-30) Photographs

If these recently published photographs barely scratch your research itch, be sure to also visit the Lt. Robert B. Fulton USS Houston Letters, the William Slough USS Houston Letters, and the USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, also available for study in our Digital Library.  Or, better yet, visit the permanent exhibition of the USS Houston on the second floor of the M.D. Anderson Library and continue your research with a closer look at the larger USS Houston & Military History Collections in the Special Collections Reading Room.

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Agnes Arnold Hall: Influences http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/05/agnes-arnold-hall-influences/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/09/05/agnes-arnold-hall-influences/#comments Fri, 05 Sep 2014 10:53:10 +0000 Dr. Stephen James http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4184 Kenneth E. Bentsen, Agnes Arnold Hall (1968), south elevation

Kenneth E. Bentsen, Agnes Arnold Hall (1968), south elevation (Photo Eric E. Johnson, by permission)

In a recent post I analyzed the formal aspects of Agnes Arnold Hall.  Like other buildings, it is a product of its time. Looking closely, we can see that Kenneth Bentsen interpreted some new ideas about composition and building layout that emerged in the early 1960s.

Agnes Arnold Hall owes more than a little to a well-known building at the University of Pennsylvania, the Richards Medical Research Building (1961) by Louis Kahn. The Richards was one of the most influential designs of the 1960s. Why? Prior to this, modern architects often expressed the building as a perfect geometric shape—usually a box and often a glass box. The usual practice was to place support services such as restrooms and stairwells in the center with the human occupants on the outside near the windows.

Louis I. Kahn, Richards Medical Research Building, University of Pennsylvania (Photo, Richard Anderson)

Louis I. Kahn, Richards Medical Research Building, University of Pennsylvania (Photo Richard Anderson by permission)

Kahn’s big breakthrough was to pull the support services out of the central core and place them on the outer edge of the building. There the services, housed in tall brick towers, became an important part of the building’s overall design (no more box!). Likewise, in Bentsen’s building the corridors, stairwells, and elevators are on the outside where they contribute to the design.

Agnes Arnold Hall also shows the influence of Paul Rudolph, another important architect of the period.  He helped popularize the style known as “Brutalism,” with its monumental concrete buildings. Best-known was his Yale University Art & Architecture Building (1963).

Paul Rudolph, Yale Art & Architecture Building (Photo Sage Ross, Common License)

Paul Rudolph, Yale Art & Architecture Building (Photo Sage Ross, CC BY-SA 2.5)

Rudolph’s buildings were extremely complex. Occupants negotiated frequent level changes, as every floor seemed to be a mezzanine to another floor. The Yale A&A was said to have 37 different levels on 9 floors. And like Kahn’s building, some of the towers on the outside held stairs, elevators, and restrooms.

Yale Art & Architecture Building, section view (The Paul Rudolph Archive, Library of Congress)

Yale Art & Architecture Building, section view (The Paul Rudolph Archive, Library of Congress)

In a small way you see some of this spatial complexity at Agnes Arnold Hall. Escalators (now stairs) thread their way through a four-story lobby area that is open to the outside. The lobby flows into an open courtyard at the basement level, and visitors enter the building over a bridge that spans this courtyard. But Rudolph’s influence is also apparent in the way the concrete is finished. Most of Bentsen’s building is faced in brick, but at the basement level the concrete retaining walls of the courtyard have what is called a “corduroy” finish. This was Rudolph’s trademark (look closely at the Yale building).  After the concrete walls were poured and the forms removed, the workers attacked the surface with a jackhammer. Instant texture.

The Kenneth E Bentsen Architectural Papers, housed at the University of Houston Special Collections, are currently being processed.

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UH1UP Challenge: Libraries Tech Training http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/04/uh1up-challenge-libraries-tech-training/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/09/04/uh1up-challenge-libraries-tech-training/#comments Thu, 04 Sep 2014 10:09:10 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2579

Get the free Scavify app and join the UH1UP Challenge to win prizes!

To help University of Houston students get the most out of their academic experience, the UH Libraries has partnered with the UH Social Media team on the UH1UP Challenge scavenger hunt.

The UH1UP Challenge is a game designed to help UH students locate and learn about on-campus resources for academic and professional success, and to score prizes along the way.

To play, students need the free Scavify app, available for iPhone or Android. Starting September 8, students can access the app which lists a set of tasks to complete by November 14. More information on how to play can be found at the UH1UP page.

One of the tasks focuses on free technology training offered at UH Libraries. Beginning, intermediate and advanced sessions in popular software, like Excel, PowerPoint, Photoshop, InDesign, iMovie and many more, are held morning, afternoon and evening in the MD Anderson Library Learning Commons. Sessions are instructor-led, with practical, personalized lessons.

To complete this task, students are encouraged to find the technology training session of their choice, register, attend and pick up a Libraries prize. At the end of the training session, students can snap a selfie with the instructor, and the task is complete.

All players who complete all UH1UP tasks will qualify for a chance to win a grand prize. Grand prizes include a MacBook Air and five iPad Minis.

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Why can't I access Safari Tech Books? http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/er/2014/08/28/why-cant-i-access-safari-tech-books/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/er/2014/08/28/why-cant-i-access-safari-tech-books/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 23:15:57 +0000 Jeannie Castro http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/er/?p=531 Safari Tech Books has a 6 simultaneous user limit. If you cannot access your book at this time, please try again later.

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Howard Barnstone's portfolio on display http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/08/27/howard-barnstones-portfolio-on-display/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/08/27/howard-barnstones-portfolio-on-display/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:22:02 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=470 Brainstorming Howard Barnstone, a small exhibit at the Architecture and Art Library, makes a persuasive case for the reexamination of Barnstone’s career, which spanned from the 1950s to the 1980s. Barnstone taught at the University of Houston where he influenced generations of students. The exhibition features original portfolios from the firm Barnstone and Partners that are permanently housed in the library’s Kenneth Franzheim Rare Books Room, as well as books he published: including The Galveston that Was (1966) and The Architecture of John Staub (1979), the first book documenting a Houston architect, copies of which are available in the Architecture and Art Library. The Galveston That Was, illustrated by Henri Cartier-Bresson, helped spur restoration of residential and commercial buildings on the island.  The exhibit was designed by Library Assistant Chelby King.

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Favorite Things: Our Patrons http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/27/favorite-things-our-patrons/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/27/favorite-things-our-patrons/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 10:13:36 +0000 Matt Richardson http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4157 REIMS.P0

Book of Hours, Use of Reims (Illuminated Pages), folio 17 recto

Whether it’s a rare book printing found at long last or piece of ephemera found in an archival collection by chance, those who visit the University of Houston Special Collections almost always find something they cannot wait to share with others.  Here we celebrate what makes the University of Houston Special Collections so special–our Favorite Things.

This series is intended to shine a light on some of the most prized things we find here in Special Collections. Sometimes, however, we are reminded that the most special of all aren’t the objects that reside in our stacks, but the people who walk through our doors.

Not long ago I was witness to a special treat in the reading room. Headed out to our foyer desk to greet a patron, I was somewhat surprised when I encountered an elementary school-aged child. While a family member searched the general stacks, this young girl had intrepidly set out in search of older, rarer quarry.

I thought of all the amazing rare books in our collections, and tried to come up with the perfect example to share.  Just before we went into the reading room to begin viewing materials, we were joined by Pat Bozeman, Head of Special Collections. Her mind quickly went to the Book of Hours, Use of Reims as a treat worthy of such a delightful and curious patron.

Watching the young researcher excitedly encounter this book was one of my favorite moments since joining the UH Libraries. It was a pleasure to watch and listen as Pat explained how the book was made and pointed out interesting details to a completely captivated child. And the girl’s reactions were a reminder of the wonder that these fantastic holdings have the power to elicit. There are lots of great things about working in the reading room, but there isn’t much that can top a child’s sincere “wow!”

The experience not only underscored the responsibility we here in Special Collections have for preserving and making accessible our cultural heritage, but was also a reminder of just how darn lucky we are to get to do it.

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Weeks of Welcome: Libraries Open House http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/26/weeks-of-welcome-libraries-open-house/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/26/weeks-of-welcome-libraries-open-house/#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 06:45:03 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2567 As part of the University of Houston Weeks of Welcome/Campus Prowl – The Road to Success, the UH Libraries invites students to its Open House on Tuesday, September 2.

Join us for the UH Libraries Open House on September 2.

Join us for the UH Libraries Open House on September 2.

From 11:00am to 1:00pm, students are encouraged to visit the MD Anderson Library and learn how to use the Libraries’ programs and services for success in academics and research.

Librarians will be present to answer questions, and students can also play games for a chance to win Libraries give-aways and Jimmy John’s sub cards.

The Libraries Open House is hosted in conjunction with the Campus Prowl – The Road to Success event, featuring even more chances to win prizes like a GoPro Camera, $150 Barnes & Noble Gift Card, and a free Campus Prowl 2014 t-shirt.

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From the Archives: Remembering Foley’s http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/25/from-the-archives-remembering-foleys/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/25/from-the-archives-remembering-foleys/#comments Mon, 25 Aug 2014 14:00:40 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4148 The summer 2014 digital issue of Houston History features a piece on the history of Foley's in the city of Houston

The summer 2014 digital issue of Houston History features a piece on the history of Foley’s in the city of Houston

The second digital issue of Houston History (Summer 2014) is on the virtual shelves and features  a piece by our own Dr. Tomkins-Walsh, “From the Archives:  Remembering Foley’s,” featuring research and images from the Foley’s Department Store Records.

We have written previously, lamenting the demise of a Foley’s presence, influencing and shaping Houston’s downtown, prior to the ultimate demolition of Kenneth Franzheim‘s bold design.  For her part, Dr. Tomkins-Walsh addresses the demolition of that building in September of 2013 as something of a catalyst on the collective, public memory that wants not for a building, but instead represents more of a nostalgia and longing for an old figurative pillar and community partner long gone.  From its origins as a dry goods store, to an early department store, through the post-war optimism reflected in the construction of Kenneth Franzheim’s icon, to the role it played in the desegregation of Houston, and on into the growth of branch stores that followed the patterns of suburban development, Tomkins-Walsh outlines in detail the symbiotic relationship that Foley’s enjoyed with the community, as well as the rich research potential the meticulous records hold across a number of fields of study.

Foley Bros. on Main St. (1906)

Foley Bros. on Main St. (1906) – available for high resolution download at our digital library

Subscribers of Houston History may read Dr. Tomkins-Walsh’s article and the rest of the latest digital issue online at the magazine’s website.  In addition, a launch party for the summer digital issue is scheduled for Tuesday, August 26th from 5:30pm to 7:00pm at the Houston Texas YMCA (5202 Griggs Rd., Houston, TX 77021).  Interested in learning more about the history of Houston as seen through that huge display window on Main Street?  Plan a visit to the Special Collections Reading Room and take a closer look at the Foley’s Department Store Records.

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Special Collections Welcomes Our New Instructional Support Assistant http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/20/special-collections-welcomes-our-new-instructional-support-assistant/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/20/special-collections-welcomes-our-new-instructional-support-assistant/#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 12:33:04 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4137 Lena Melinger, Instructional Support Assistant for UH Special Collections

Lena Melinger, Instructional Support Assistant for UH Special Collections, will assist in preparations for classes using rare books and archival materials in the Special Collections Evans Room.

We are very happy to welcome our new Instructional Support Assistant, Lena Melinger to the team.  Lena joined Special Collections last week and in her new role will work closely with Julie Grob, Coordinator for Instruction, as she provides support in preparing for classes using rare books and archival materials in the Special Collections Evans Room.

Every semester the Evans Room hosts a wide variety of classes, supporting the studies and research of undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Houston.  Having previously attended visiting classes in the Evans Room gives Lena a keen insight as she makes preparations for the coming semester.  With the summer preseason nearly behind us and the fall semester quickly approaching, Lena has hit the ground running, currently busying herself preparing materials for Dr. David Mazella’s Introduction to Literary Studies course (scheduled to visit Special Collections in early September to take a closer look at the works of Jonathan Swift).

This fall Lena begins her junior year as a Creative Writing major, studying in the Honors College.  Born and raised in Austin, Lena has lived and studied in Seattle and Houston.  With an expected graduation year of 2015 at the earliest, Lena is still narrowing her plans for the future, hinting that where she lives will no doubt play a role in how she lives.   Are libraries and archives in her future?  Only time will tell.

In the meantime, we’ll do our best trying to influence that career track and ask you to join us in welcoming Lena, as we are so very pleased to have her on board!

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Top 10 Things to Do at UH Libraries http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/19/top-10-things-to-do-at-uh-libraries/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/19/top-10-things-to-do-at-uh-libraries/#comments Tue, 19 Aug 2014 09:51:38 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2542 The Fall 2014 semester is upon us, and the University of Houston Libraries has the resources, services and programs you need for success in academics and research. Our Top 10 Things to Do at UH Libraries is a quick guide to get you started on a great semester.

10. Get research help.
Stuck on a research project? Need writing or presentation advice? Contact your friendly and knowledgeable subject librarian for personalized research help. Subject librarians are the ultimate search engine!

BONUS: Research Guides are your online source for all things research-related. Each guide gives you subject-specific research tools and methods to help you ace your assignment.

9. Study and collaborate.
We have over 117,000 square feet of study space. You’ll find a variety of environments to suit your needs, from study hives to silent zones to tech-ready group work areas. Plus, our extended hours give you more freedom to pop in when you need to.

Regents Reading Room, MD Anderson Library, Second Floor Brown Wing

Regents Reading Room, MD Anderson Library, Second Floor Brown Wing

BONUS: Need to practice a presentation with your team? Reserve a group study room online, or request a key in person at the Service Desk.

8. Power up your productivity.
The MD Anderson Library is home to two large computing facilities located on the first floor, with Windows workstations for research and study needs, and specialized multimedia and data analysis resources on both PC and Mac. Print, copy and scan services are also available.

BONUS: Left your laptop at home? Check out a netbook from the Service Desk for in-library use.

7. Take a break.
In addition to workspace, the Libraries has areas for you to recharge between classes. Visit the Leisure Reading collection, located on the first floor of MD Anderson Library, and relax with a variety of newer titles in fiction and nonfiction. Browse the collection online.

Leisure Reading, MD Anderson Library First Floor

Leisure Reading, MD Anderson Library First Floor

6. Create a multimedia masterpiece.
The Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, located in the Learning Commons, features audio recording booths and professional-grade equipment to help you create high-quality productions.

Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

BONUS: Check out HD video cameras and DSLRs from the Learning Commons.

DOUBLE BONUS: UH students may take photos or record video in the MD Anderson Library for course assignments (individuals cannot be photographed without their permission). Prior approval is required.

5. Learn a new language.
Access the online Mango Languages Learning System, available for free to all UH students, staff and faculty. Choose from over 60 languages, and learn at your own pace.

Learn a new language with online tutorials.

BONUS: Off-campus access to this and other electronic resources, including e-books, databases and audio files, is available with your CougarNet log-in.

4. Search and discover.
Looking for a journal, book, image, report or dissertation? Start with OneSearch, accessible from the Libraries’ home page, and find targeted results from a wide variety of sources.

BONUS: If we don’t have it, Interlibrary Loan lets you borrow materials from another library.

3. Branch out.
UH Libraries comprises not only the MD Anderson Library, but also three branch libraries: the Architecture and Art Library, the Music Library and the Optometry Library. You’ll find more subject experts and specialized collections at these locations.

2. Visit Special Collections.
Open to all, Special Collections organizes, preserves and promotes rare archival items, including books, manuscripts, photographs and other ephemera. Find unique materials in 11 collecting areas, including Performing Arts, Hispanic Collections, University Archives and more, made available for study in the Special Collections Reading Room.

BONUS: Special Collections hosts curated exhibits in the MD Anderson Library, featuring a variety of engaging and enriching subjects.

DOUBLE BONUS: Browse the UH Digital Library for access to rare historical items in digital format curated from Special Collections, the Architecture and Art Library and the Music Library.

1. Attend tech training.
We offer free technology training to all UH students, staff and faculty. Beginning, intermediate and advanced sessions in popular software, like Excel, PowerPoint, Photoshop, InDesign, iMovie and many more, are held morning, afternoon and evening to fit your busy schedule. Sessions are instructor-led, with practical, personalized lessons.

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Book of the Month: Queechy by Elizabeth Wetherell (or Susan Warner) http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/18/book-of-the-month-queechy-by-elizabeth-wetherell-or-susan-warner/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/18/book-of-the-month-queechy-by-elizabeth-wetherell-or-susan-warner/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:33:39 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4124 In addition to the over 7,000 linear feet of archival collections made available for study at the University of Houston Special Collections, we are also proud to offer over 100,000 rare and antique books for use in our reading room. Each month we will highlight a text from our collections and what makes it so special.

cover of Queechy / by Elizabeth Wetherell (Susan Warner)

cover of Queechy / by Elizabeth Wetherell (Susan Warner)

Book of the Month:  Queechy by Elizabeth Wetherell, as recommended by Julie Grob, Coordinator for Instruction at the University of Houston Special Collections.

Why So Special?  “The pictorial cloth binding with a decoration of flowers that are multicolored,” writes Grob.  “I’m a sucker for over-the-top publishers bindings from the 19th century, and this is one of the more elaborate in our collection.”

Originally published in 1852, Queechy was Susan Warner’s second novel, following her widely-translated debut, The Wide, Wide World (1850), also written under the pen name Elizabeth Wetherell.  That book’s popularity gave Warner the distinction of being one of the most popular authors of a new nation still finding its literary voice.  Our copy of Queechy is a glittering and gilded display that no doubt would have brought color to the cheeks of  Warner’s Puritan forebearers.  Pictorial green cloth stamped in gold, red, blue, yellow and black. Edges gilt.”

detail of page edges

detail of page edges

Location:  Pictures will not do this one justice.  If you would care for a closer look, Queechy is available for study in the University of Houston Special Collections Reading Room, during our normal research hours.  To spend some time with Fleda Ringgan as she crisscrosses the Atlantic, please request PS3155.Q4 1800z.

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New Digital Collection: Early Texas Documents http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/15/new-digital-collection-early-texas-documents/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/15/new-digital-collection-early-texas-documents/#comments Fri, 15 Aug 2014 08:47:22 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4101 $200 pay certificate for Alexander Wray Ewing (June 7, 1836), for "my pay in the Army of Texas." Ewing served as surgeon general of the Texas army and, two months prior, had treated Sam Houston at the battle of San Jacinto.

$200 pay certificate for Alexander Wray Ewing (June 7, 1836), for “my pay in the Army of Texas.” Ewing served as surgeon general of the Texas army and, two months prior, had treated Sam Houston at the battle of San Jacinto. — (available for high-resolution download through our Digital Library or for further study via our Early Texas Documents Collection)

The digitization of the Early Texas Documents Collection which has recently been published has been a monumental task several years in the making. With nearly 1,300 items, the documents trace not only the activities of prominent Texans and founders, such as Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin, but give researchers  a glimpse into what life was like for Texans in the early 19th through  transactions involving land, finances,  legal matters, and in some cases chattel and slaves. In addition, military documents chronicle the Battle of San Jacinto between General Sam Houston and Santa Anna’s forces. There are also military scrips that document the pay soldiers received for their time of service within the Texas Army and Navy.

Genealogists may also find the documents of interest as the subjects of their research may have written letters, or their names may appear on financial or legal documents contained within the collection. The collection also contains early examples of currency utilized during the Republic era.  Selections of these currencies have been featured in the exhibit On the Run: Currency, Credit and Capitals of the Republic of Texas this past June at the Texas Capital Visitors Center in Austin. In short, the collection contains something for everyone.

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Remembering Lauren Bacall http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/13/remembering-lauren-bacall/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/13/remembering-lauren-bacall/#comments Wed, 13 Aug 2014 15:57:41 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4104 Lauren Bacall, a legend (though she despised the word) and icon of Hollywood’s golden era who taught the world how to whistledied in New York on Tuesday.

Born Betty Joan Perske to working-class immigrants in Brooklyn, her parents divorced when she was six years old.  Her mother, Natlie Perske (maiden name, Weinstein-Bacal) moved to Manhattan and young Betty Joan would go on to usher theaters on Broadway and model dresses on Seventh Avenue before her enigmatic beauty drew inquiries from Hollywood.  She left for the West Coast in 1942, reemerging as Lauren Bacall (“Lauren” at the behest of producer and director Howard Hawks, the additional “L” to assist in pronunciation), catching the silver screens aflame with a mystique and unmistakable, smoldering vocal delivery.

“Betty” to long-time friends and family, but always “Baby” to “Bogie,” she sometimes bristled at the attempts of others to define her in the context of that other iconic actor, her screen foil, and her husband (until his death in 1957), Humphrey Bogart.  “Being a widow,” she once told an interviewer, “is not a profession.”  Bacall and Bogart sparked on and off screen in To Have and Have Not (1944), married in 1945, and would go on to star opposite one another in The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948).

detail from Larry McMurtry's notes, working with Lauren Bacall and George Stevens, Jr., from the Larry McMurtry Papers

detail from Larry McMurtry’s notes, working with Lauren Bacall and George Stevens, Jr., from the Larry McMurtry Papers

Others will offer up more appropriate insights into the artistry and legacy of Bacall.  Today, however, while obituaries abound generously peppered with the name “Bogart,” as she’d once predicted and lamented long before her passing, an interesting item from the Larry McMurtry Papers provides even more context to the Bacall-Bogart dynamic.  In 1977 McMurtry worked with Bacall and George Stevens, Jr. as part of “The Stars Salute America’s Greatest Movies,” honoring the best 500 films to date.  Bacall was to introduce The African Queen (1951, John Huston), starring her late husband.

McMurtry quotes Bacall on her recollections of the filming of African Queen and Bogart’s co-star, Katharine Hepburn:  “John knew what he wanted.  Bogey and Kate were the only two stars crazy enough to follow him and [producer] Sam Spiegel to Africa… It was the beginning of my friendship with Katie–an important part of my life and it still is.”  Twenty years after Bogart’s death, however, it was clear he still served as a foil.  Reflecting on their conversation, McMurtry writes, “In terms of the introduction, she would like it to be clear that she has a reputation of her own–that she is not simply Bogey’s widow.  Obviously, it will be clear in her presentation that it is not purely coincidental that she is doing the introduction to AFRICAN QUEEN which starred Bogey.”

She must have known, however, that her legacy remains quite her own.  Honored throughout her life by a list that includes the Screen Actors Guild, the Tony Awards, and the Golden Globes, she also received a National Book Award for her autobiography By Myself (1978).  While she does recount those famous loves lost (Frank Sinatra once reportedly proposed to Bacall), she also recounts her rise as a starlet in a very particular heyday for Hollywood, including this interesting tidbit on how she went about acquiring her signature sound at the direction of Hawks:

He wanted me to drive into the hills, find some quiet spot, and read aloud. He felt it most important to keep the voice in a low register. Mine started off low, but what Howard didn’t like and explained to me was, “If you notice, Betty, when a woman gets excited or emotional she tends to raise her voice. Now, there is nothing more unattractive than screeching. I want you to train your voice in such a way that even if you have a scene like that your voice will remain low.” I found a spot on Mulholland Drive and proceeded to read The Robe aloud, keeping my voice lower and louder than normal. If anyone had ever passed by, they would have found me a candidate for the asylum. Who sat on mountaintops in cars reading books aloud to the canyons?

The Larry McMurtry Papers are available for study, along with twenty-one other Contemporary Literature collections, in the University of Houston Special Collections Reading Room.

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Social Science Data Librarian Provides Specialized GIS Support http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/11/social-science-data-librarian-provides-specialized-gis-support/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/08/11/social-science-data-librarian-provides-specialized-gis-support/#comments Mon, 11 Aug 2014 12:42:40 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2535 University of Houston faculty and researchers have a new, central resource for data-related services.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new social science data librarian, providing expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new social science data librarian, providing expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new Social Science Data Librarian in the department of Liaison Services, a position that was created to provide expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

The University has a pressing need for centralized support in geographic information systems (GIS) data acquisition, analysis and visualization. UH Libraries is pleased to offer high-level research support and data-related services for faculty and students of all disciplines across campus.

Liaison Services is currently assessing the needs of social science departments that are using GIS and data visualization tools and methodologies, specifically, political science, economics and social work. Been will work to create new services and tools based on department feedback and course needs.

“Our data acquisition component puts the Libraries in a strategic position to assist faculty and students of all disciplines,” Been said. “We can help faculty and students get the data they need, clean the data, analyze it and visualize it.” The Libraries’ turnkey data support includes the provision of access to many subscription databases, including referenceUSA, Data-Planet and Social Explorer, to name a few.

Going further, data visualization tools give researchers new and innovative ways to tell stories and illustrations with graphics. Common tools for presenting data are the built-in graphic charts in Excel or SPSS, yet mapping and plotting data allows the researcher to spot trends or other surprising facets that a spreadsheet just can’t match.

“The graphing capabilities of Excel are quite powerful,” Been said. “However, there are so many new tools that are designed to increase our ability to create a visualization that matches our imagination. Some of these tools can create amazing visualizations within minutes of opening the application, while others may require some coding. Basically, it makes data fun.”

New services include open demos and hands-on workshops beginning in Fall 2014, conducted in the MD Anderson Library with customized exercises in GIS and data visualization for students. Additionally, users of the Libraries will have a new research guide detailing GIS and data visualization services, tools and methods. Dedicated office hours will be open for students to receive personalized assistance. 

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See the Exhibit, Read the Book, Watch the Film! http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/06/see-the-exhibit-read-the-book-watch-the-film/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/06/see-the-exhibit-read-the-book-watch-the-film/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 08:39:55 +0000 Julie Grob http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4075 Many of the books featured in our current exhibition LGBTQI Literature: Celebrated Classics and Contemporary Works have been adapted into acclaimed movies and TV miniseries. From eighties costume drama Brideshead Revisited to this spring’s HBO film The Normal Heart, the stories of people who identify as LGBTQI have made for compelling drama on the big and small screen.

With the dog days of summer upon us, we recommend that you come view the exhibition, stop off for lunch or dinner at Eric’s Restaurant on campus, and then unwind at home with one of the following:

http://youtu.be/_ZtPGYLEzpw

Those who are suffering from Downton Abbey withdrawal might enjoy the British miniseries Brideshead Revisited (1981), the tale of a friendship that develops between two young men at Oxford in the decade following WWI. Based on the novel by Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead… made a star of Jeremy Irons.

http://youtu.be/b0vlCyf3uyA

Desert Hearts (1985), directed by Donna Deitch and based on the novel Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule, is considered a classic of lesbian film. It centers on the realistic romance between divorcing housewife Vivian and casino worker Cay in Reno, Nevada.

http://youtu.be/QvpgNiU018s

Steven Spielberg directed The Color Purple (1985), an adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker. In it, main character Celie (played by Whoopi Goldberg) finds her life changed by an affair with the beautiful blues singer Shug.

http://youtu.be/FOzpSSsJbV8

Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City (1993) was the first of three miniseries based on the writer’s popular books about life in a San Francisco apartment building in the 1970s. It starred a less well-known Laura Linney as the naive new tenant Mary Ann, and Olympia Dukakis as landlady Mrs. Madrigal. Various straight and gay neighbors with their own stories rounded out the characters.

http://youtu.be/jdyEgNy9O8M

The script for the two-part HBO production of Angels in America (2003) was adapted by Tony Kushner from his play about the AIDS epidemic in Reagan’s America. Angels… won 11 Emmy Awards including acting nods for Al Pacino as closeted conservative attorney Roy Cohn, and Jeffrey Wright as the compassionate nurse Belize.

http://youtu.be/jO6UL_bd-OY

Brokeback Mountain (2005) started out as a story by Annie Proulx in her 1999 collection Close Range: Wyoming Stories. The tale of two ranch hands who fall in love was adapted into a full-length screenplay by Larry McMurtry and his writing partner Diana Ossana. The Ang Lee-directed film starred Jake Gyllenhaal and the late Heath Ledger as the star-crossed Western lovers.

http://youtu.be/nD83NZ-7N60

In May 2014, miniseries The Normal Heart debuted on HBO. Based on Larry Kramer’s 1985 play about activism during the early years of the AIDS crisis, it starred Mark Ruffalo and Julia Roberts, and will be released on DVD later this month.

LGBTQI Literature: Celebrated Classics and Contemporary Works will be on view on the 1st floor of MD Anderson Library through Sept. 26, 2014.

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Paddock Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council Records http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/04/paddock-greater-houston-convention-visitors-council-records/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/08/04/paddock-greater-houston-convention-visitors-council-records/#comments Mon, 04 Aug 2014 11:46:06 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=3901 "Houston is a Great Place to Make Films"

“Houston is a Great Place to Make Films” / from the production of Adam, pictured left to right, Steve Moore of GHCVC, Jo Beth Williams, Daniel J. Travanti, and Melvia Tennant of GHCVC (1983) / photo by Marianita Paddock, Paddock Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council Records

The University of Houston Special Collections is proud to announce the recent publication of the Paddock Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council Records finding aid.

These papers of Mildred and Harold Paddock show research potential in relation to their documentation of work conducted by the the Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council, with most materials coming from the time their daughter, Marianita Paddock, worked with the GHCVC.  The first series in this collection deals specifically with these types of materials, containing correspondence, speeches, press releases, and other promotional publications.  Particularly interesting is a look into Houston’s late twentieth century development as a  destination for large and small screen productions via the sub-series “Film in Houston,” containing press releases, industry journals, production schedules, and photographs capturing behind-the-scenes glimpses of productions, the city, and the iconic locales used in filming (predominantly from the 1980s).  Among the films documented in the records are Middle Age Crazy (starring Bruce Dern), Adam (based on the true story of Adam Walsh’s kidnapping), and Murder at the World Series (which counted the Astrodome among its filming locations).

Filming Murder at the World Series (1976) / photo by George Wilkins, Paddock Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council Records

Filming Murder at the World Series (1976) / photo by George Wilkins, Paddock Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Council Records

The second series in this collection contains memorabilia related to the city of Houston and the state of Texas at-large, including bulletins, mailers, programs, and tickets collected by the Paddocks predominantly from the mid to late twentieth century.  Of particular interest, and included among these materials, is a recording of the moon landing from 1969.

These materials, further expanding our larger Houston & Texas History Collection, are available for study in the Special Collections Reading Room during our normal summer hours.  We look forward to seeing you and assisting you in your research!

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Alley Theatre Exhibit Spotlights Nina Vance

categories: Announcements, Special Event or Display

A new exhibit at the University of Houston Libraries illuminates the life of visionary Alley Theatre founder Nina Vance, and provides a contextual history of the theatre’s rise to prominence.

In 1947, Vance mailed 214 penny postcards bearing the question, “Do you want a new theater for Houston?” Soon, the Alley Theatre was born.

Nina Vance | Photo from the Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers, UH Special Collections

Nina Vance | Photo from the Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers, UH Special Collections

From the exhibit:

From its modest beginnings in a dance studio on Main Street, to a converted fan factory on Berry Avenue, to a state-of-the-art building downtown, the road to becoming the nationally recognized theatre it is today was paved with talent, generosity, and hard work. The woman behind it all remained the same, Nina Vance. As the theatre’s founder and artistic director for more than thirty years, Vance was a guiding force for the theatre and worked tirelessly to see it become a Houston institution.

The exhibit features programs, photographs, articles, correspondence, and other memorabilia from the UH Special Collections Nina Vance Alley Theatre Papers.

Visitors are invited to view the exhibit at the MD Anderson Library starting October 25, 2014 through May 8, 2015. The exhibit opens concurrently with the 100th anniversary of Vance’s birth.

For more information, contact Catherine Essinger 713-743-2337, and Stacey Lavender, 713-743-9605.

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New Databases at UH Libraries

categories: New Resource

The following databases are now available from the University of Houston Libraries:

Alt-HealthWatch
A full-text database of periodicals, peer-reviewed journals, academic and professional publications, magazines, consumer newsletters and newspapers, research reports, and association newsletters focused on contemporary, alternative and integrated approaches to health care and wellness.

American Indian Histories and Cultures
A wide-ranging digital resource presenting a unique insight into interactions between American Indians and Europeans from their earliest contact, continuing through the turbulence of the American Civil War, the on-going repercussions of government legislation, right up to the civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century. This resource contains material from the Newberry Library’s extensive Edward E. Ayer Collection.

American West
Original manuscripts, maps, ephemeral material, and rare printed sources from the Graff Collection about the American West, including tales of frontier life, Native Americans, vigilantes, and outlaws, and the growth of urban centers and environmental impact of westward expansion and of life in the borderlands.

Global Commodities
This resource brings together manuscript, printed and visual primary source materials for the study of global commodities in world history. The commodities featured in this resource have been transported, exchanged and consumed around the world for hundreds of years. They helped transform societies, global trading operations, habits of consumption and social practices.

Health Source, Consumer Edition
Provides consumer oriented information on many health topics including the medical sciences, food sciences and nutrition, childcare, adult health, behavioral health, cardiology, drug and medication information, pediatric health, senior health, women’s health, and sports medicine.

Literary Reference Center
This full-text database provides a spectrum of information on authors and their works across literary disciplines and time frames to give scholars, professors, and researchers a foundation of literary reference works to meet their research needs.

Natural and Alternative Treatments
Natural & Alternative Treatments contains detailed information on almost 200 different conditions and the conventional and natural treatments used to treat them, over 300 herbs and supplements, plus drug-herb and drug-supplement interactions for more than 90 drug categories.

Project Euclid: Mathematics and Statistics Online
Project Euclid is a joint effort by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press; this not-for-profit online publishing service provides access to journals, monographs, and conference proceedings in the fields of theoretical and applied mathematics and statistics.

ProQuest Congressional Publications
Provides users with access to a comprehensive collection of historic and current congressional information.

For database assistance, visit Electronic Resources Help.

Fall 2014 Grad Student Mixer

categories: Announcements

University of Houston graduate students are invited to the Fall 2014 Graduate Student Mixer, hosted by UH Libraries.

UH graduate students are invited to the Grad Student Mixer on October 7.

UH graduate students are invited to the Grad Student Mixer on October 7.

The event serves as an opportunity for graduate students to network with one another, and allows them to meet subject librarians in a fun and relaxed atmosphere.

Date: Tuesday, October 7
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Rockwell Pavilion, second floor of MD Anderson Library

NOTE: Must be 21 to consume alcohol. IDs will be checked at the door.

UH Libraries Welcomes Resource Description Coordinator

categories: Announcements

The University of Houston Libraries provides a vast array of resources that supplement teaching, learning, and research. Resources, including both physical and electronic materials, are cataloged and described using standards and processes that optimize accessibility to users.

Hayley Moreno joins the UH Libraries as the new resource description coordinator, managing cataloging workflow to make materials more accessible.

Hayley Moreno joins the UH Libraries as the new resource description coordinator, managing cataloging workflow to make materials more accessible.

UH Libraries recently welcomed Hayley Moreno as its new Resource Description Coordinator. In this role, Moreno will manage cataloging workflow for increased efficiency and collaboration with Metadata and Digitization Services. Her goal is to make UH Libraries’ materials more accessible, using the standard and schema, Resource Description and Access (RDA).

Cataloging is the comprehensive creation of bibliographic data that enables library users to find the resources they seek; whether it’s a book, database, journal or non-print media. Contemporary cataloging requires an ever-evolving skill set among librarians which reflects new trends and standards. For instance, the term resource description refers to a newer protocol for the formulation of bibliographic data.

As such, Moreno sees an interesting future for resource description. “The schemas that we use are changing,” she said. “We’re moving towards linked data, which requires librarians to use web technologies like URIs, HTTP and RDF.”

Moreno noted that the reason for the shift in the ways libraries perform resource description is because some information is still not widely accessible. “Resources in a library’s catalog may not be retrievable when using web search engines,” Moreno said. “Traditional bibliographic description limits discoverability of library resources on the web.”

Traditional bibliographic schema used in cataloging is phasing out as more libraries adopt new schemas that find relevant information on the web by connecting data structures and placing previously hidden resources into the hands (and screens) of users.

Libraries and institutions that incorporate new coding protocols will strengthen their ability to connect with one another’s data structures and provide more access to materials, giving library users results similar to what they experience with search engine results.

“Changing the way we describe things – creating structured data, and generating relationships from it – that’s the framework behind the idea of finding a resource from anywhere on the web,” Moreno said.

Celebrating 15 Years of Poetry and Prose at UH

categories: Announcements

The 2014-2015 season of Poetry and Prose: Creative Writers at the University of Houston kicks off on September 17.

University of Houston students, faculty, staff and the community are invited to the 2014-2015 season of Poetry and Prose: Creative Writers at the University of Houston.

The series, now in its 15th year, kicks off on September 17 and will feature new MFA and PhD students in the UH Creative Writing Program.

Erika Brown, Will Burns, Samuel Dinger, Jonathan Meyer, Luisa Muradyan and Georgia Pearle are scheduled to read selected works of poetry and fiction.

All readings are held in the Honors College Commons in the MD Anderson Library and begin at 5:30 p.m. Readings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

The next reading is scheduled for October 15, featuring faculty poets.

UH1UP Challenge: Libraries Tech Training

categories: Announcements

Get the free Scavify app and join the UH1UP Challenge to win prizes!

To help University of Houston students get the most out of their academic experience, the UH Libraries has partnered with the UH Social Media team on the UH1UP Challenge scavenger hunt.

The UH1UP Challenge is a game designed to help UH students locate and learn about on-campus resources for academic and professional success, and to score prizes along the way.

To play, students need the free Scavify app, available for iPhone or Android. Starting September 8, students can access the app which lists a set of tasks to complete by November 14. More information on how to play can be found at the UH1UP page.

One of the tasks focuses on free technology training offered at UH Libraries. Beginning, intermediate and advanced sessions in popular software, like Excel, PowerPoint, Photoshop, InDesign, iMovie and many more, are held morning, afternoon and evening in the MD Anderson Library Learning Commons. Sessions are instructor-led, with practical, personalized lessons.

To complete this task, students are encouraged to find the technology training session of their choice, register, attend and pick up a Libraries prize. At the end of the training session, students can snap a selfie with the instructor, and the task is complete.

All players who complete all UH1UP tasks will qualify for a chance to win a grand prize. Grand prizes include a MacBook Air and five iPad Minis.

Weeks of Welcome: Libraries Open House

categories: Announcements

As part of the University of Houston Weeks of Welcome/Campus Prowl – The Road to Success, the UH Libraries invites students to its Open House on Tuesday, September 2.

Join us for the UH Libraries Open House on September 2.

Join us for the UH Libraries Open House on September 2.

From 11:00am to 1:00pm, students are encouraged to visit the MD Anderson Library and learn how to use the Libraries’ programs and services for success in academics and research.

Librarians will be present to answer questions, and students can also play games for a chance to win Libraries give-aways and Jimmy John’s sub cards.

The Libraries Open House is hosted in conjunction with the Campus Prowl – The Road to Success event, featuring even more chances to win prizes like a GoPro Camera, $150 Barnes & Noble Gift Card, and a free Campus Prowl 2014 t-shirt.

Top 10 Things to Do at UH Libraries

categories: Announcements

The Fall 2014 semester is upon us, and the University of Houston Libraries has the resources, services and programs you need for success in academics and research. Our Top 10 Things to Do at UH Libraries is a quick guide to get you started on a great semester.

10. Get research help.
Stuck on a research project? Need writing or presentation advice? Contact your friendly and knowledgeable subject librarian for personalized research help. Subject librarians are the ultimate search engine!

BONUS: Research Guides are your online source for all things research-related. Each guide gives you subject-specific research tools and methods to help you ace your assignment.

9. Study and collaborate.
We have over 117,000 square feet of study space. You’ll find a variety of environments to suit your needs, from study hives to silent zones to tech-ready group work areas. Plus, our extended hours give you more freedom to pop in when you need to.

Regents Reading Room, MD Anderson Library, Second Floor Brown Wing

Regents Reading Room, MD Anderson Library, Second Floor Brown Wing

BONUS: Need to practice a presentation with your team? Reserve a group study room online, or request a key in person at the Service Desk.

8. Power up your productivity.
The MD Anderson Library is home to two large computing facilities located on the first floor, with Windows workstations for research and study needs, and specialized multimedia and data analysis resources on both PC and Mac. Print, copy and scan services are also available.

BONUS: Left your laptop at home? Check out a netbook from the Service Desk for in-library use.

7. Take a break.
In addition to workspace, the Libraries has areas for you to recharge between classes. Visit the Leisure Reading collection, located on the first floor of MD Anderson Library, and relax with a variety of newer titles in fiction and nonfiction. Browse the collection online.

Leisure Reading, MD Anderson Library First Floor

Leisure Reading, MD Anderson Library First Floor

6. Create a multimedia masterpiece.
The Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, located in the Learning Commons, features audio recording booths and professional-grade equipment to help you create high-quality productions.

Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

BONUS: Check out HD video cameras and DSLRs from the Learning Commons.

DOUBLE BONUS: UH students may take photos or record video in the MD Anderson Library for course assignments (individuals cannot be photographed without their permission). Prior approval is required.

5. Learn a new language.
Access the online Mango Languages Learning System, available for free to all UH students, staff and faculty. Choose from over 60 languages, and learn at your own pace.

Learn a new language with online tutorials.

BONUS: Off-campus access to this and other electronic resources, including e-books, databases and audio files, is available with your CougarNet log-in.

4. Search and discover.
Looking for a journal, book, image, report or dissertation? Start with OneSearch, accessible from the Libraries’ home page, and find targeted results from a wide variety of sources.

BONUS: If we don’t have it, Interlibrary Loan lets you borrow materials from another library.

3. Branch out.
UH Libraries comprises not only the MD Anderson Library, but also three branch libraries: the Architecture and Art Library, the Music Library and the Optometry Library. You’ll find more subject experts and specialized collections at these locations.

2. Visit Special Collections.
Open to all, Special Collections organizes, preserves and promotes rare archival items, including books, manuscripts, photographs and other ephemera. Find unique materials in 11 collecting areas, including Performing Arts, Hispanic Collections, University Archives and more, made available for study in the Special Collections Reading Room.

BONUS: Special Collections hosts curated exhibits in the MD Anderson Library, featuring a variety of engaging and enriching subjects.

DOUBLE BONUS: Browse the UH Digital Library for access to rare historical items in digital format curated from Special Collections, the Architecture and Art Library and the Music Library.

1. Attend tech training.
We offer free technology training to all UH students, staff and faculty. Beginning, intermediate and advanced sessions in popular software, like Excel, PowerPoint, Photoshop, InDesign, iMovie and many more, are held morning, afternoon and evening to fit your busy schedule. Sessions are instructor-led, with practical, personalized lessons.

Social Science Data Librarian Provides Specialized GIS Support

categories: Announcements

University of Houston faculty and researchers have a new, central resource for data-related services.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new social science data librarian, providing expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new social science data librarian, providing expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

Joshua Been joins the UH Libraries as the new Social Science Data Librarian in the department of Liaison Services, a position that was created to provide expert support for researchers working with geospatial, numeric and other data.

The University has a pressing need for centralized support in geographic information systems (GIS) data acquisition, analysis and visualization. UH Libraries is pleased to offer high-level research support and data-related services for faculty and students of all disciplines across campus.

Liaison Services is currently assessing the needs of social science departments that are using GIS and data visualization tools and methodologies, specifically, political science, economics and social work. Been will work to create new services and tools based on department feedback and course needs.

“Our data acquisition component puts the Libraries in a strategic position to assist faculty and students of all disciplines,” Been said. “We can help faculty and students get the data they need, clean the data, analyze it and visualize it.” The Libraries’ turnkey data support includes the provision of access to many subscription databases, including referenceUSA, Data-Planet and Social Explorer, to name a few.

Going further, data visualization tools give researchers new and innovative ways to tell stories and illustrations with graphics. Common tools for presenting data are the built-in graphic charts in Excel or SPSS, yet mapping and plotting data allows the researcher to spot trends or other surprising facets that a spreadsheet just can’t match.

“The graphing capabilities of Excel are quite powerful,” Been said. “However, there are so many new tools that are designed to increase our ability to create a visualization that matches our imagination. Some of these tools can create amazing visualizations within minutes of opening the application, while others may require some coding. Basically, it makes data fun.”

New services include open demos and hands-on workshops beginning in Fall 2014, conducted in the MD Anderson Library with customized exercises in GIS and data visualization for students. Additionally, users of the Libraries will have a new research guide detailing GIS and data visualization services, tools and methods. Dedicated office hours will be open for students to receive personalized assistance. 

UH Libraries Announces Microgrant Winners

categories: Announcements

UH Libraries announces the 2014-2015 Microgrant Program winners.

The University of Houston Libraries is pleased to announce the winners of the 2014-2015 Microgrant Program.

The program, now in its 6th year, was created to foster new and innovative ideas in support of the Libraries’ Strategic Directions and the University’s Tier One Initiatives. Librarians and library staff submitted fresh, experimental concepts for novel services and programs which would benefit teaching, learning and research objectives of the UH community.

The UH Libraries Microgrant Program winners for 2014-2015 are:

Project title: Houston Art Libraries Collaboration
Chelby King (project lead), Chris Conway, Catherine Essinger, Donovan Parker

In conjunction with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Hirsch Library and The Menil Collection Library, the Architecture and Art Library will host an open house at each location for School of Art faculty, graduate students, and museum researchers. Attendees will be introduced to services, collections and primary resources unique to that library. Each open house will include a tour of the host facility, a meet-and-greet reception, and a booklet with summary information about each library for students.

This event series builds upon a partnership agreement signed by MFAH and UH in 2012 to encourage collaboration between arts researchers at both institutions. It aims to support research needs of graduate students; provide opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the generation of ideas; and strengthen institutional partnerships.

Project title: Research in the Real World Lecture Series
Donovan Parker (project lead), Chris Conway, Catherine Essinger, Chelby King

A series of lectures created for UH students in the School of Art will be held each semester. Lectures will consist of panel discussions with art and design professionals. Topics will include research methodology specific to art and design careers, and the information resources of which students should be aware. This project supports student success and strengthens institutional partnerships.

Project title: African American Read-In
Rachel Vacek (project lead), Julie Grob, Andrea Malone, Jesse Sharpe

Since 1989, the Black Caucus of the National Council of Teachers of English has sponsored the National African American Read-In. UH Libraries will host a Read-In for which students, staff and faculty can sign up to read self-selected book passages, articles, poetry, speeches, and other works written by African Americans. The Libraries will identify unique materials from Special Collections and the stacks to inspire those in search of reading material. This project supports the Libraries’ goals of providing innovative programming and pursuing transformative partnerships.

Project title: Bundt Cake for Charity
Rachel Vacek (project lead), Kelsey Brett, Lee Hilyer, Alex Simons

November 15th is both National Bundt Cake Day and National Philanthropy Day. The Libraries will host a bundt cake sale with proceeds going to a philanthropic organization. With each cake/slice sold, Bundt Cake for Charity aims to bring awareness of the Libraries’ services and programs to a wider audience.

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