UH Libraries News http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu Mon, 12 Jan 2015 20:57:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.3 Literary Manuscripts and Correspondence http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/22/literary-manuscripts-and-correspondence/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/22/literary-manuscripts-and-correspondence/#comments Thu, 22 Jan 2015 14:21:31 +0000 Stacey Lavender http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4514 Ezra Pound, handwritten notes on “The Genteel Tradition in Liberal Education” by Harold A. Taylor, undated (Literary Manuscripts and Correspondence)

Ezra Pound, handwritten notes on “The Genteel Tradition in Liberal Education” by Harold A. Taylor, undated (Literary Manuscripts and Correspondence)

The University of Houston Special Collections is excited to announce the publication of the Literary Manuscripts and Correspondence finding aid. Items in this collection, which include letters, notes, and writings by several major literary figures, were previously housed separately in our A-Z files, but have now been gathered into one place to provide easier access for researchers interested in contemporary literature.

In this collection you’ll find items from many recognizable writers, such as Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Charles Bukowski, and Eugene O’Neill. The materials also cover a wide range of time periods and locales. The oldest item, a letter from English poet Richard Braithewate, was written in 1634, while the newest, an article written by James Thurber for the magazine Adirondack Life, is from 1991. The collection also contains materials both from close to home, including letters written by Texas’ own Katherine Anne Porter, and abroad, such as letters written by Irish novelist Norah Hoult and an autograph from Romanian playwright Eugène Ionesco.

Take a closer look at the finding aid to see which of your favorite authors make an appearance, or better yet, come visit us at Special Collections and see these unique and interesting materials in person!

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Olive Hershey Papers http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/16/olive-hershey-papers/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/16/olive-hershey-papers/#comments Fri, 16 Jan 2015 15:26:17 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4504 Page one of "Pigeon Shoot" chapter draft from Truck Dance, featuring edits from Donald Barthelme (Olive Hershey Papers).

Page one of “Pigeon Shoot” chapter draft from Truck Dance, featuring edits from Donald Barthelme (Olive Hershey Papers).

We are very pleased to announce the recent publication of the Olive Hershey Papers finding aid.

Born in Houston, Texas in 1941, Olive Hershey was educated at Connecticut College and the University of Texas at Austin before attending the University of Houston’s Creative Writing Program.  Studying under trailblazing postmodernist Donald Barthelme and alongside the likes of Tracy Daugherty, Hershey earned her M.A. from UH in 1987.  Her published works include a collection of poems entitled Floating Face Up and her novel Truck Dance (originally her thesis while studying at UH).

The Olive Hershey Papers contain drafts, revisions, editorial notes, and writings from a handful of Hershey’s projects, however the bulk of materials are related to Truck Dance.  Particularly noteworthy are the drafts of the various chapters filled with the edits and suggested revisions of Daugherty and the unmistakable scrawl and insight of Barthelme.

A fine complement to our Contemporary Literature collections, the Olive Hershey Papers help provide even more context for a community of authors that established the University of Houston as a destination for emerging and talented literary voices.  For more information on the life and work of Olive Hershey we invite you to consult this newly published finding aid.  The original materials of the Olive Hershey Papers can be viewed in the Special Collections Reading Room.

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Barthelme Architectural Papers Join UH Digital Library http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/13/barthelme-architectural-papers-join-uh-digital-library/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2015/01/13/barthelme-architectural-papers-join-uh-digital-library/#comments Tue, 13 Jan 2015 10:46:59 +0000 Dr. Stephen James http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4470 Donald Barthelme, Adams Petroleum Center (c. 1955), aerial view  of proposed complex (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

Donald Barthelme, Adams Petroleum Center (c. 1955), aerial view of the proposed complex on Fannin at Brays Bayou. (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

The UH Digital Library recently announced its newest addition—the Donald Barthelme Sr. Architectural Papers and Photographs. The Digital Library makes accessible online important holdings of the University of Houston libraries and archives. These new items illustrate the work of noted architect Donald Barthelme through pencil sketches, photographs, and the detailed working drawings used to construct his buildings. They are only a small part of the total found in the Donald Barthelme Sr. Architectural Papers, but they illustrate his most important projects.

Barthelme Residence (c. 1952), living room looking east with parents' bedroom in the background (Donald Barthelme Sr. Architectural Papers and Photographs)

Barthelme Residence (c. 1952), living room looking east with parents’ bedroom in the background. (Donald Barthelme Sr. Architectural Papers and Photographs)

The earliest is Barthelme’s own residence (1939), a small flat-roof modernist house on Wynden Drive. The open plan created the illusion of a larger space within. A grid of Japanese tatami mats covering the floor met a similar grid of windows facing the patio. He filled the living room with iconic modernist furniture by Alvar Aalto, Charles Eames, and Eero Saarinen. In an unusual feature, the parents’ bedroom was open to the living room; a folding screen provided privacy from the children.

St. Rose of Lima Church and School won an award of merit from the American Institute of Architects in 1948 for its simple and austere brick forms. But Barthelme’s most important building was the award-winning West Columbia Elementary School,

Donald Barthelme, West Columbia Elementary School (1951), north court (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

Donald Barthelme, West Columbia Elementary School (1951), north court. (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

completed in 1951. Its innovative design departed from the traditional practice of placing classrooms along both sides of a long corridor. Instead, he arranged the building around two large courtyards; classrooms opened to the courts through floor-to-ceiling glass walls. The picture of a teacher and her students captures the cheerful atmosphere of Barthelme’s light-filled classrooms.

West Columbia Elementary School (1951), view of classroom with teacher and students (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

West Columbia Elementary School (1951), view of classroom with teacher and students. (Donald Barthelme Architectural Papers and Photographs)

In the mid-1950s, the Adams Petroleum Company hired Barthelme to design its new office building on Fannin Street. The company hoped to develop the large site as an office park, with the APC building to be followed by other office buildings. Barthelme spent hundreds of hours planning the large complex before Adams abandoned the scheme. The Digital Library contains a selection of rarely seen studies for this ambitious unbuilt project.

Through the UH Digital Library the public now has easy access to these images, some of which have never been published. As usual, the Donald Barthelme Sr. Architectural Papers are available to researchers at the UH Libraries’ Special Collections department.

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New Student Art Added to UH Libraries’ Digital Library - Yours Could Be Next http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2015/01/12/new-student-art-added-to-uh-libraries-digital-library-yours-could-be-next/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2015/01/12/new-student-art-added-to-uh-libraries-digital-library-yours-could-be-next/#comments Mon, 12 Jan 2015 18:23:17 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=511 The William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library proudly supports student artists by hosting a venue for the display of their work. Located on the library’s mezzanine level, the A2 Alcove comprises an intimate gallery space complete with natural light and comfortable lounge seating. Rotating exhibitions provide year-round opportunities for those seeking an audience for their work.  Student artists interested in exhibiting work are encouraged to contact the library’s Supervisor, Chris Conway (at ccconway@uh.edu) with digital samples of proposed exhibition work. All submissions are evaluated by library staff (with possible, additional input from UH School of Art faculty and/or Blaffer Museum representatives). Determination of acceptance is based on an individual work’s:

-artistic merit/value

-aesthetic quality

-potential appeal to wide campus audience

-formal execution and/or conceptual idea demonstrating the artists’ commitment to the creative practice

-suitability and appropriateness for display within the library

 

Beyond the temporary, physical exhibition of work inside the library, all displayed work is digitally documented and uploaded into UH Libraries’ Digital Library. The Student Art Exhibits collection provides an easily accessible, fascinating, permanent archive of all student work displayed in the library. Check out the most recent additions to the collection:

Nabila Dadabhoy’s Library Series

and

Shivendra Singh’s Varied Views

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Illustrated Timeline on Display in TDECU Stadium http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2015/01/08/illustrated-timeline-on-display-in-tdecu-stadium/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2015/01/08/illustrated-timeline-on-display-in-tdecu-stadium/#comments Thu, 08 Jan 2015 09:34:43 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2768 The University of Houston Libraries recently collaborated with campus partners to present highlights in UH history.

A pictorial timeline of storied UH people and events is now on display in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU Stadium. The 2200 square-foot special event space serves as a game day club for the north loge boxes and Section 129 on the north side of the stadium.

University of Houston History timeline in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU stadium.

University of Houston History timeline in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU stadium.

The project came to fruition through the efforts of Katina Jackson and Jeff Conrad from Athletics, Oscar Gutierrez from the Office of the UH President, Debbie Harwell from the Wilson Center for Public History, Nancy Clark from the University of Houston Alumni Association, Eric Gerber from the Office of University Communication and Mary Manning and Matt Richardson from the University Archives in Special Collections, which contributed a majority of images that celebrate the story of UH.

“As part of his gift to the stadium, Corby Robertson requested there be an area that recognizes all the highlights and milestone events of the University of Houston, not just athletics,” said Katina Jackson. “The committee that helped make this vision a reality did an outstanding job. The finished product is not only informative but should give everyone a great sense of pride in all that has been accomplished at UH since 1927.”

View photos of the timeline.

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Join us on Facebook! http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/music/2014/12/23/join-us-on-facebook/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/music/2014/12/23/join-us-on-facebook/#comments Tue, 23 Dec 2014 10:46:37 +0000 lanes http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/music/?p=465 Did you know that the UH Music Library has a Facebook page?

Visit our page at https://www.facebook.com/uhmusiclibrary to get weekly highlights on new collection items, events, and music news.

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Video Now Available -- Life With Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Literature http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/19/video-now-available-life-with-books-collecting-reading-and-teaching-lgbtqi-literature/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/19/video-now-available-life-with-books-collecting-reading-and-teaching-lgbtqi-literature/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:14:27 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4463 This fall semester UH Special Collections hosted Edward Lukasek and Dr. Natalie Houston in a panel discussion, “Life With Books: Collecting, Reading, and Teaching LGBTQI Literature.”  If you could not make the event or if you would like to remember that very special conversation, please enjoy the recently published video below courtesy of University of Houston Libraries.

http://youtu.be/4W_WkOyVSwc

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Book of the Month: George Ade’s Fables in Slang http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/17/book-of-the-month-george-ades-fables-in-slang/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/17/book-of-the-month-george-ades-fables-in-slang/#comments Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:32:21 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4447 Fables in Slang by George AdeIn addition to the over 7,000 linear feet of archival collections made available for study at the University of Houston Special Collections, we are also proud to offer over 100,000 rare and antique books for use in our reading room. Each month we highlight a text from our collections and what makes it so special.  This month’s selection is contributed by Library Specialist for Liaison Services and Curator for the new Unique Holdings brown bag lecture series, Kristine Greive.

George Ade’s Fables in Slang is a collection of satirical fables with titles like “The Fable of the Martyr who Liked the Job” and “The Fable of the Professor who Wanted to be Alone.”  Originally published in a Chicago newspaper, these tales mock all the personality types of late nineteenth century America. Even better, the fables are thoroughly illustrated in a bold, exaggerated style, and each ends with a sarcastic moral. In “The Fable of the Man who Didn’t Care for Story-Books,” for example, a man decides that contemporary literature is “all a mockery,” describing all the literature he has read and found lacking. The story concludes with the moral that “Only the more Rugged Mortals should attempt to Keep Up on Current Literature.”

All A Mockery

“All A Mockery,” from George Ade’s Fables in Slang, illustrated by Clyde J. Newman.

Read a few of Ade’s fables and you’ll join a group of admirers that stretches back over a hundred years. Ade was enormously popular in the early twentieth century; in fact, the advertisement for his other books in the back of Fables in Slang asserts that “Mr. Ade’s books are too well known to require comment here.” He had influential fans, too: Taft held his first presidential campaign rally at Ade’s home, and Theodore Dreiser so admired Ade’s gift for description he even lifted a passage from his fables for use in the original edition of Sister Carrie. In his book on Ade, Lee Coyle locates a passage in the letters of Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh calling Ade “the greatest living American writer, ” an assertion that, while controversial even then, illustrates the name recognition Ade enjoyed in his time. He may not be as well known today, but Ade is forever being rediscovered, with periodic new editions of his works.

Fables in Slang was also recently discussed in The Last Untapped Resource in Houston, the first brown bag lecture in the Unique Holdings series highlighting rare books in our collection. The next event is April 22 and will feature life science books, ranging from centuries old illustrations of mythological animals to contemporary fine press books. In the meantime, why not come to the Special Collections Reading Room and read some fables? Just ask for call number PS1006.A6 F3 1900.

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M.D. Anderson Library: The Forgotten Master Plan http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/15/m-d-anderson-library-the-forgotten-master-plan/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/15/m-d-anderson-library-the-forgotten-master-plan/#comments Mon, 15 Dec 2014 11:32:12 +0000 Dr. Stephen James http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4418 M.D. Anderson Library has grown with the University of Houston, and its modest original building has been enlarged several times as needs have changed. Within these additions it is still possible to see evidence of the library’s 1970s master plan, only part of which was carried out.

At the building’s core is the original structure opened in 1950, a conservative modernist design by Staub and Rather. Clad in the white limestone of the university’s original buildings, the library harmonized with the nearby Ezekiel Cullen building without upstaging it. When the original library building, known today as the Red Wing, became inadequate, the university responded by adding a large eight-story tower (the Blue Wing), completed in 1968. Designed by Staub, Rather and Howze, the tower housed the research collections and study carrels necessary to support the university’s graduate degree programs.

Anderson Library Tower

This architect’s rendering shows the library’s original building (the Red Wing) in the foreground with the proposed tower (the Blue Wing) in the back. (UH Photographs Collection, University of Houston Buildings)

Despite this impressive addition, the university’s growth made further library expansion inevitable. In 1975 administrators retained Kenneth Bentsen (UH 1952), architect for Agnes Arnold Hall (1968) and Philip G. Hoffman Hall (1974), to prepare a master plan that would guide this expansion. Bentsen proposed to enlarge the library’s main building substantially in three phases over a ten-year period. The first phase would include a five-story wing on the north side of the building and a new black-glass façade that would house a lobby and lounge area. This addition (the Brown Wing) was completed in 1978 according to Bentsen’s design.

Phase Two would add a matching five-story wing on the south side. When more space was needed, a third phase would add two more floors to the north and south wings. Bentsen projected that this three-stage expansion might be completed by the end of the 1980s.

Kenneth Bentsen's 1975 master plan proposed to expand the M.D. Anderson library building in three phases. (Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

Kenneth Bentsen’s 1975 master plan proposed to expand the M.D. Anderson library building in three phases. (Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers)

That decade brought a major recession in the energy industry, which devastated the Texas economy. State government funding for building projects dried up, and the university was unable to continue with the proposed library additions.

When planning for a major library expansion resumed in the late 1990s, the architects Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott followed Bentsen’s general idea for a large wing on the south side while renovating the main entrance with a new façade inspired by the Ezekiel Cullen building. The library’s 1975 master plan has been forgotten, but some of its ideas lived on.

Anderson_2008_sm

M.D. Anderson Library as it appears today, with most recent additions by Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott (2005). (Photo by the author)

The Kenneth E. Bentsen Architectural Papers are housed in the library’s Special Collections Department and are currently being processed. Pictures of the M.D. Anderson Library and other campus buildings are available in the University of Houston Buildings Collection of the UH Digital Library.

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The Donald Barthelme Sr., Architectural Drawings and Photographs is now available in the UH Digital Library http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/12/11/the-donald-barthelme-sr-architectural-drawings-and-photographs-is-now-available-in-the-uh-digital-library/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/12/11/the-donald-barthelme-sr-architectural-drawings-and-photographs-is-now-available-in-the-uh-digital-library/#comments Thu, 11 Dec 2014 13:03:05 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=506 The collection found here highlights the career of Donald Barthelme (1907–1996), the first Houston architect to gain national prominence in the years after World War II.  These 57 items illustrate his work through pencil sketches, photographs, and the detailed working drawings used to construct his buildings.

Barthelme first gained attention in 1936 as the lead designer for the Hall of State, the principal building of the Texas Centennial Exposition in Dallas. In 1948 he won an award from the American Institute of Architects for Houston’s St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, applauded for its simple Scandinavian modern forms. Yet he made his reputation with the West Columbia Elementary School of 1951, which won many awards and was published internationally. Its innovative design departed from the traditional practice of placing classrooms along both sides of a long corridor. Instead, Barthelme arranged the building around two large courtyards; classrooms opened to the courts through floor-to-ceiling glass walls. This flooded the rooms with light while providing a sheltered environment for the students. At the main entrance a flamboyant scalloped canopy greeted visitors.

In addition to the St. Rose and West Columbia buildings, the collection includes Barthelme’s own residence. He built this small modernist house for his family about 1939. The original drawings are lost, but he enlarged it slightly a decade later, and the collection preserves his 1949 drawings for this remodeling.

Of particular interest, and rarely seen, are a few of his studies for the Adams Petroleum Center (1954–58), his largest and most ambitious project. The Adams Petroleum Company wanted to develop its large site as an office park. Barthelme planned to build the complex in four phases, beginning with the client’s own building. He spent hundreds of hours studying different designs for the APC tower and preparing a dramatic aerial view. The company later abandoned the scheme and constructed only a modest building without the tower.

Barthelme helped shaped the look of Houston during its postwar boom. Today only the church buildings still stand, but the West Columbia school district has preserved his entrance canopy at the original site of the elementary school.

Several of Barthelme’s children became prominent writers, and the works of his eldest son, Donald Barthelme, Jr., are preserved in the Donald Barthelme Literary Papers.

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Donald Barthelme, Sr. Architectural Papers.

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Public History Grad Students Learn about the Archival Profession via Women’s Archives http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/10/public-history-grad-students-learn-about-the-archival-profession-via-womens-archives/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/12/10/public-history-grad-students-learn-about-the-archival-profession-via-womens-archives/#comments Wed, 10 Dec 2014 16:30:21 +0000 Julie Grob http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4404 Students in the Archival Practice and Organizational Histories course meeting in the Evans Room of Special Collections.

Students in the Archival Practice and Organizational Histories course meeting in the Evans Room of Special Collections.

The UH Public History Program prepares graduate students interested in history for positions in various historical venues, government agencies, business enterprises, and educational institutions. This fall, students enrolled in Dr. Kairn Klieman’s course “Archival Practice and Organizational Histories” spent three weeks immersed in the theory behind archives and the work of professional archivists. Coordinator for Instruction Julie Grob welcomed the students to Special Collections, where they focused their learning on the fascinating collections that make make up the Carey C. Shuart Women’s Archive & Research Collection (WARC). The goal of the unit was to encourage students to consider archives as a potential career, introduce them to the riches of WARC, and lead them to understand how archivists and institutions make collecting decisions which may perpetuate the dominant narrative or fill in gaps in the historical record.

Student working with the Hispanic Women in Leadership Records.

Student working with the Hispanic Women in Leadership Records.

Students in the course read a variety of journal articles about archival theory and practice, attended lectures and discussions led by Grob, toured Special Collections, and completed a project in which they arranged a photocopied version of an archival collection in order to duplicate the work on an archivist. Their favorite activity was probably exploring some of the WARC archival collections related to local organizations such as the Hispanic Women in Leadership Records, Women in Action Records, and Women in the Visual and Literary Arts Records. One pair of students was excited to find correspondence between the Houston Council of Texas Garden Clubs and (then Senator) Lyndon B. Johnson, related to an environmental cause. Students also enjoyed a visit from Vince Lee, curator for WARC, who spoke to the class about his background and career path to the field of archives, and his work with donors and incoming collections.

The course was also open to advanced undergraduate students, one of whom is pictured here.

The course was also open to advanced undergraduate students, one of whom is pictured here.

Following the archives unit, the students went on to work extensively with the local nonprofit Voices Breaking Boundaries, recording oral histories and writing an organizational history to document the organization. The records of Voices Breaking Boundaries, and the oral histories created by Dr. Kairn’s students, will be added to WARC.

If you are interested in exploring the collections yourself, you may visit the WARC website to view finding aids (guides to the collections) and digital collections, or stop by Special Collections during our open hours. If you are a faculty member interested in having a unit developed around archival practice or our primary source collections, please e-mail Julie Grob.


“Archival Practice and Organizational Histories” Course Visits Special Collections

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UH Libraries acquires Aker Architectural Photographic Records Collection http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/12/01/uh-libraries-acquires-aker-architectural-photographic-records-collection/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/12/01/uh-libraries-acquires-aker-architectural-photographic-records-collection/#comments Mon, 01 Dec 2014 11:42:31 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=502 Architectural photographer Joe Aker has given a collection of images to the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections.

The Aker Architectural Photographic Records Collection comprises roughly 50,000 distinct images depicting scenes of commercial architecture over the past three decades.

SOM 450 Lexington, New York City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

Aker, owner of Aker Imaging, has worked with leading architecture and real estate firms, such as Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Robert A.M. Stern, César Pelli, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Philip Johnson, HOK, Kirksey and Ziegler Cooper; as well as Gerald D. Hines Interests and Trammell Crow.

In 2011, Aker began considering the future for his vast collection of photography. He contacted UH Special Collections, whose mission is to preserve, safeguard, organize, and describe primary sources in a number of collecting areas for teaching and research activities of students and scholars.

The Aker collection offers a rare view of the architectural landscape in Houston and other major cities, including a photographic record of original models of structures that were never built, as well as plans, renderings, models and final photography of the finished buildings. What makes this collection of images special are the many photographs showing the process of design from the first drawing of the first model to the final design model and the finished building.

Composite of Hines Del Bosque, Mexico City, Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

Aker was one of the first to digitally produce structural model composites before the advent of computer-generated graphics. Working with Houston digital artist Raphaele Malandain, he would photograph a site where a building was set to be constructed, photograph the building model, and drop the model image onto the site image using analog film composition, resulting in a close representation of the future finished building.

As a whole, Aker says, the collection tells a fascinating story of Houston’s economic booms and busts. For more information on this new and growing collection, contact Vince Lee.

Thanks to Vince Lee and Esmeralda Fisher for text.

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Welcome Sara Craig http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/25/welcome-sara-craig/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/25/welcome-sara-craig/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 12:11:39 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4396 At work in the stacks.  We welcome Sara Craig to the University of Houston Special Collections, University Archives team.

At work in the stacks.
We welcome Sara Craig to the University of Houston Special Collections, University Archives team.

This fall semester the University of Houston Special Collections added a new member, Sara Craig, to our team.

In the role of University Archives Student Assistant, Sara works part-time supporting the needs of the University Archives as well as other archival collections, assisting with reference questions, updating finding aids, assisting with collection management and shelving, accessioning materials, and helping to arrange and describe new collections.

Originally from South Carolina, Sara has studied engineering at the University of Southern California, and holds an Associate Degree in Library Information Technology.  An art major here at the University of Houston, Sara enjoys working with her hands and looks forward to pursuing further education that will allow her to pursue a career in book repair and conservation.  It may be in her genes.

With a horticulturist mother and a father working in cabinetry and furniture-making, Sara remembers, “I was the only four-year old girl I knew with a toolbox and a garden plot.”  With that upbringing and a hands-on-DIY ethos, Sara meets the day-to-day surprises and challenges of working in the archives with aplomb.  In her brief time here, she has already contributed to the publication of several finding aids such as the Minnie Fisher Cunningham: McArthur-Smith Research Papers, assisted with a collections shift in the archival stacks, rehoused oversized historical materials from the KUHF Collection, and co-curated the “UH Homecoming Through the Years” online exhibition.

We look forward to Sara’s continued expertise, insight, and support as the University Archives and Special Collections seek new ways to assist our patrons in their day-to-day research.

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Architecture and Art Library hours - Thanksgiving week http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/21/architecture-and-art-library-hours-thanksgiving-week/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/21/architecture-and-art-library-hours-thanksgiving-week/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 17:50:33 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=499
  • Monday:
    8:00am – 8:00pm
  • Tuesday:
    8:00am – 8:00pm
  • Wednesday:
    8:00am – 5:00pm
  • Thursday-Sunday:
    Closed
  • ]]>
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    Second Annual Gaming Event Held at UH Libraries http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/21/second-annual-gaming-event-held-at-uh-libraries/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/21/second-annual-gaming-event-held-at-uh-libraries/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:45:35 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2720 Over 160 students, faculty and staff, alumni and visitors from the Houston area attended Game On, Cougars! at the University of Houston Libraries this month.

    The event, now in its second year, offers a full day of open gaming, complete with board games, card games, miniature gaming, puzzles and video games.

    Game On, Cougars! offers a full day of open gaming, complete with board games, card games, miniature gaming, puzzles and video games.

    The second annual Game On, Cougars! was a hit with gaming enthusiasts.

    This year, UH Libraries partnered with FoodMachine Houston to hold a food drive during Game On, Cougars! benefiting the Houston Food Bank. Attendees contributed over $1600 in food items and cash donations. The group also taught board games, ran raffles, and managed Warmachine miniatures.

    Members of Houston Pathfinder Society also attended, and gave participants tutorials on role-playing games. Several organizations donated games for play at the event, and game stores were also on hand to run demos and sell games, including Ettin Games.

    Game On, Cougars! is hosted as part of International Games Day @ Your Library, an initiative of the American Library Association that encourages communities to connect with their libraries through the educational, recreational and social value of games.

    View photos from Game On, Cougars! 2014.

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    New Collection Portrays Houston’s Architectural Domain http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/21/new-collection-portrays-houstons-architectural-domain/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/21/new-collection-portrays-houstons-architectural-domain/#comments Fri, 21 Nov 2014 14:04:36 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2708
    Architectural photographer Joe Aker has given a collection of images to the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections.

    The Aker Architectural Photographic Records Collection comprises roughly 50,000 distinct images depicting scenes of commercial architecture over the past three decades.

    SOM 450 Lexington, New York City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    SOM 450 Lexington, New York City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Aker, owner of Aker Imaging, has worked with leading architecture and real estate firms, such as Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Robert A.M. Stern, César Pelli, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Philip Johnson, HOK, Kirksey and Ziegler Cooper; as well as Gerald D. Hines Interests and Trammell Crow.

    Of particular interest are images of properties developed by Gerald D. Hines, for which the University of Houston College of Architecture is named. It is one of the largest collections of photographs of his buildings completed in the twentieth century.

    In 2011, Aker began considering the future for his vast collection of photography. He contacted UH Special Collections, whose mission is to preserve, safeguard, organize, and describe primary sources in a number of collecting areas for teaching and research activities of students and scholars.

    The Aker collection offers a rare view of the architectural landscape in Houston and other major cities, including a photographic record of original models of structures that were never built, as well as plans, renderings, models and final photography of the finished buildings. What makes this collection of images special are the many photographs showing the process of design from the first drawing of the first model to the final design model and the finished building.

    Composite of Hines Del Bosque, Mexico City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Composite of Hines Del Bosque, Mexico City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Aker was one of the first to digitally produce structural model composites before the advent of computer-generated graphics. Working with Houston digital artist Raphaele Malandain, he would photograph a site where a building was set to be constructed, photograph the building model, and drop the model image onto the site image using analog film composition, resulting in a close representation of the future finished building.

    As a whole, Aker says, the collection tells a fascinating story of Houston’s economic booms and busts. For more information on this new and growing collection, contact Vince Lee.

    ]]>
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    UH Libraries Hosts Bake Sale for Charity http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/20/uh-libraries-hosts-bake-sale-for-charity/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/20/uh-libraries-hosts-bake-sale-for-charity/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 14:30:31 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2702 University of Houston Libraries Bundt Cakes for Charity

    Proceeds from Bundt Cakes for Charity benefited Education Foundation of Harris County.

    In honor of National Bundt Cake Day and National Philanthropy Day last week, University of Houston Libraries held a bake sale to raise funds for a local organization.

    The Education Foundation of Harris County supports innovative learning programs for the 800,000+ K-12 public education students in the greater Houston region, and provides training for teachers leading science, technology, engineering and math after-school programs.

    UH librarians and staff baked, prepped and sold a variety of sweet treats in the MD Anderson Library and University Center, and in just a few hours, raised over $500 for the Education Foundation of Harris County.

    The Bundt Cakes for Charity bake sale was made possible by the Libraries’ microgrant program, an initiative designed to foster new and innovative ideas by librarians and library staff that support the Libraries’ strategic directions.

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    Dog Days of December: Paws and Relax at UH http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/19/dog-days-of-december-paws-and-relax-at-uh/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/blog/2014/11/19/dog-days-of-december-paws-and-relax-at-uh/#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 13:05:24 +0000 Esmeralda Fisher http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/?p=2696 As finals approach, the University of Houston Libraries is partnering with a local organization to bring therapy dogs back to campus for a fun and stress-free study break.

    Certified therapy dogs of Faithful Paws will arrive at the MD Anderson Library for four days in December. UH students are encouraged to stop by for petting, snuggling and treat-feeding with gentle and friendly canines.

    paws_fall14

    Location: rooms 106P and 106T in the MD Anderson Library

    December 8: 8:00 – 10:00 p.m. (concurrent with Finals Mania)

    December 9: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    December 10: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    December 11: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    View photos from Spring 2014 Paws and Relax.

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    Library Ambassadors host the Asia Showcase on November 19th http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/19/library-ambassadors-host-the-asia-showcase-on-november-19th/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/19/library-ambassadors-host-the-asia-showcase-on-november-19th/#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 12:01:26 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=495 Asia

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    Architecture Student Mixer 4-5 today http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/19/architecture-student-mixer-4-5-today/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/19/architecture-student-mixer-4-5-today/#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 11:58:59 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=492
  • Are you planning to work as an architect upon graduation?
  • Would you like to find out what kind of day-to-day research is likely to be required?
  • Wish to learn from the experience of notable CoA alumni?
  • Want to network with successful architects working in practice and related fields?
  • Like free food?
  • All of these are valid reasons to come to the William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library on Wednesday, November 19th from 4-5 pm.

    We are launching a new series of receptions called Research in the Real World, in which we ask successful people working in our fields of study about the nature of their work and how they acquire the information they need to excel.

    For our inaugural event on the 19th we have invited three College of Architecture alumni who work in three very different environments.

    Kim L. Busch, Assoc AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Gensler

    Ross Lukeman, founder, Alternative Homes Today, and Proposal and Project Specialist, Applied Security Technologies

    Wilbert Taylor, Senior Project Manager, Office of Real Estate Services, University of Houston

    Come to the library’s upper mezzanine at 4 next Wednesday for a 20 minute Q&A with the architects, followed by a reception.

    Food and drinks provided by Mandola’s Deli.

    itecture-students/#sthash.gi9Bs8wz.dpuf

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    Selections from the Franzheim Rare Books Room Now Available in the Digital Library http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/18/selections-from-the-franzheim-rare-books-room-now-available-in-the-digital-library/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/18/selections-from-the-franzheim-rare-books-room-now-available-in-the-digital-library/#comments Tue, 18 Nov 2014 14:58:37 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=489 We are pleased to announce the ongoing project Selections from the Franzheim Rare Books Room is now available in the UH Digital Library!  This digital collection presents examples of notable works housed in the University of Houston’s Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room.  The room contains approximately 1000 rare or unique books, journals, and pamphlets on fine art and design.  Highlights of the collection include portfolios of building types, architectural product catalogs, and first editions of some of the 20th century’s greatest books on art and architecture.  The books in the collection date from the mid-16th century to artists’ books published in the 21st century.  The Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room is located within the William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library on the first floor of the College of Architecture.

    This collection is expected to grow over the coming months and years, so please check back occasionally to discover newly added volumes!

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    Research in the Real World - a new event for architecture students http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/13/research-in-the-real-world-a-new-event-for-architecture-students/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/13/research-in-the-real-world-a-new-event-for-architecture-students/#comments Thu, 13 Nov 2014 18:05:09 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=487 Are you planning to work as an architect upon graduation?

    Would you like to find out what kind of day-to-day research is likely to be required?

    Wish to learn from the experience of notable CoA alumni?

    Want to network with successful architects working in practice and related fields?

    Like free food?

     

    All of these are valid reasons to come to the William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library on Wednesday, November 19th from 4-5 pm.

     

    We are launching a new series of receptions called Research in the Real World, in which we ask successful people working in our fields of study about the nature of their work and how they acquire the information they need to excel.

     

    For our inaugural event on the 19th we have invited three College of Architecture alumni who work in three very different environments.

     

    Kim L. Busch, Assoc AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Gensler

    Ross Lukeman, founder, Alternative Homes Today, and Proposal and Project Specialist, Applied Security Technologies

    Wilbert Taylor, Senior Project Manager, Office of Real Estate Services, University of Houston

     

    Come to the library’s upper mezzanine at 4 next Wednesday for a 20 minute Q&A with the architects, followed by a reception.

     

    Food and drinks provided by Mandola’s Deli.

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    Photos of the Architecture & Art Library's open house http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/12/photos-of-the-architecture-art-librarys-open-house/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/2014/11/12/photos-of-the-architecture-art-librarys-open-house/#comments Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:26:11 +0000 Catherine Essinger http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/architecture_art/?p=484 VV (2)

     

    On the evening of Tuesday, October 28th, the William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library held an open house and reception. The private mixer brought together, in convivial fashion, some forty UH art history graduate students and faculty members with representative staff from other local arts research facilities, including The Menil Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston’s Hirsch Library. The star of the evening was the Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Rooms; guests were treated to a brief tour and overview of the architecture and art branch’s own special collection. Students and faculty members alike expressed gratitude for the opportunity to meet other members of Houston’s arts community and to learn more about the research collections at UH’s Architecture and Art Library. Fostering strong and friendly relations with the area’s other researchers and research facilities is one more way UH Libraries helps enhance the academic experience and success of our core patrons.

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    1914-2014: Commemorating One Hundred Years -- World War I http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/11/1914-2014-commemorating-one-hundred-years-world-war-i/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/11/1914-2014-commemorating-one-hundred-years-world-war-i/#comments Tue, 11 Nov 2014 12:46:16 +0000 Gregory Yerke http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4384 1914 - 2014: Commemorating One Hundred Years - World War I

    “1914 – 2014: Commemorating One Hundred Years – World War I,” an exhibit from the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections

    In remembrance of a dark centennial, those opening days of the Great War, the University of Houston Special Collections is proud to offer “1914-2014: Commemorating One Hundred Years — World War I,” a small exhibition of materials held by Special Collections relating to World War I and curated by our own Pat Bozeman, Head of Special Collections.

    On November 11, 1918 Germany and the Allies of World War I met in a rail carriage in Compiègne and agreed to a cease fire to take effect on “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month,” ending major hostilities of the world’s first, great war.  It had begun a little over four years prior, in the summer of 1914, and promised a quick and decisive shift in the fault lines of Europe.  Instead, this four year meat grinder would cast a long shadow that rewrote our maps, crumbled our empires, redefined our relationships with one another, and, far from teaching humanity a final and humbling lesson, it ushered in the great and awful maw of man that would be warfare in this new century and our next millennium.

    However, for just a brief window beginning that autumn morning in November of 1918, the world was allowed to collectively sigh and reach for rest.  Armistice Day, a day celebrating that longing for calm and peace in the aftermath of war, was born.

    As you remember those lost and celebrate the peace they helped bring, we invite you to view this exhibit of original materials produced among the storm and in its wake.  “1914-2014: Commemorating One Hundred Years — World War I” is available for viewing on the first floor of the M.D. Anderson Library at the foot of the Morrie & Rolaine Abramson Grand Staircase.  Highlights include writings from George Bernard Shaw (who saw the wasted lives of youth suffering through the death throes of empires and for capital’s immorality), Rudyard Kipling’s France at War (“They come and fill the trenches and they die… They send more and those die.”), and remarkable examples of WWI propaganda.

    If reflections on today have you interested in researching more, remember that in addition to the rare works highlighted above, UH Special Collections is also proud to offer the USS Houston & Military History Collections for study in our Reading Room during normal hours or you can review our Military History Collections via our Digital Library, 24/7, 365 days a year.

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    Book of the Month: John Dos Passos' Nineteen Nineteen http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/04/book-of-the-month-john-dos-passos-nineteen-nineteen/ http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/2014/11/04/book-of-the-month-john-dos-passos-nineteen-nineteen/#comments Tue, 04 Nov 2014 10:59:39 +0000 Matt Richardson http://weblogs.lib.uh.edu/speccol/?p=4332 In addition to the over 7,000 linear feet of archival collections made available for study at the University of Houston Special Collections, we are also proud to offer over 100,000 rare and antique books for use in our reading room. Each month we will highlight a text from our collections and what makes it so special.  This month, Matt Richardson shares John Dos Passos’ Nineteen Nineteen from the U.S.A. trilogy.

    The front cover of Nineteen Nineteen by John Dos Passos

    The front cover of Nineteen Nineteen by John Dos Passos

    John Dos Passos’ U.S.A. is a sprawling look at American life in the early 20th century that takes place across 3 novels, several decades, and over 1000 pages. Consisting of the novels The 42nd Parallel (1930), Nineteen Nineteen (1932), and The Big Money (1936), it was first published as single volume in 1938 by Harcourt Brace. In addition to the rather straightforward narrative passages, Dos Passos’ work incorporates collections of headlines and popular songs in “Newsreel” segments, impressionistic renderings called the “Camera Eye,” and short biographies, often satiric, of prominent Americans. Beyond the complexity and innovation of the form itself, the element that typically garners the most critical attention is the cinematic stream of consciousness Camera Eye, which often elicits comparisons to Joyce. Though the novels purport to be the epic of one nation, Dos Passos’ U.S.A. inevitably overflows those boundaries, as it is filled with characters who frequently journey abroad and are continually shaped by their imaginings of and interactions with the wider world. This perspective is especially apparent in the middle novel of the trilogy, Nineteen Nineteen, which focuses on the trying years of World War I and the unsettled peace that followed it.

    "To Adrienne Rich cordially John Dos Passos"

    “To Adrienne Rich cordially John Dos Passos”

    UH Libraries’ Special Collections has the distinct pleasure of holding a 1946 printing of Nineteen Nineteen signed by Dos Passos himself. Interestingly, the inscription reads: “To Adrienne Rich cordially John Dos Passos”. How the author might have encountered the American poet, essayist, and feminist, or for that matter how the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections later came into possession of her copy, would no doubt make for an interesting tale in its own right. (Though it’s not her only appearance in our collections). And since this 1946 printing was originally issued as a box set by Houghton Mifflin, one wonders what became of its companion copies of The 42nd Parallel and The Big Money. Bound in rather austere tan buckram with a stencil-style “U.S.A.” stamped across a small blue field, the exterior of the book almost evokes a government provision of the type Dos Passos’ enlisted men might receive. In contrast, the interior includes vivid end-sheets and illustrations by Reginald Marsh.

    Nineteen Nineteen by John Dos Passos

    The end sheets of Nineteen Nineteen by John Dos Passos

    And should the 1000+ page epic constitute more time than you can devote to our reading room, fear not! After you’ve taken a look at our signed copy here in Special Collections, you’ll be pleased to find circulating copies of the U.S.A. trilogy in the general collections stacks of the M.D. Anderson Library.

     

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    UH Libraries News

    UH Libraries News

    Illustrated Timeline on Display in TDECU Stadium

    The University of Houston Libraries recently collaborated with campus partners to present highlights in UH history.

    A pictorial timeline of storied UH people and events is now on display in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU Stadium. The 2200 square-foot special event space serves as a game day club for the north loge boxes and Section 129 on the north side of the stadium.

    University of Houston History timeline in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU stadium.

    University of Houston History timeline in the Coach Bill Yeoman Hall, located in the northeast corner of the new TDECU stadium.

    The project came to fruition through the efforts of Katina Jackson and Jeff Conrad from Athletics, Oscar Gutierrez from the Office of the UH President, Debbie Harwell from the Wilson Center for Public History, Nancy Clark from the University of Houston Alumni Association, Eric Gerber from the Office of University Communication and Mary Manning and Matt Richardson from the University Archives in Special Collections, which contributed a majority of images that celebrate the story of UH.

    “As part of his gift to the stadium, Corby Robertson requested there be an area that recognizes all the highlights and milestone events of the University of Houston, not just athletics,” said Katina Jackson. “The committee that helped make this vision a reality did an outstanding job. The finished product is not only informative but should give everyone a great sense of pride in all that has been accomplished at UH since 1927.”

    View photos of the timeline.

    m4s0n501
    Posted on January 8th, 2015 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Special Event or Display | Comments Off
    Second Annual Gaming Event Held at UH Libraries

    Over 160 students, faculty and staff, alumni and visitors from the Houston area attended Game On, Cougars! at the University of Houston Libraries this month.

    The event, now in its second year, offers a full day of open gaming, complete with board games, card games, miniature gaming, puzzles and video games.

    Game On, Cougars! offers a full day of open gaming, complete with board games, card games, miniature gaming, puzzles and video games.

    The second annual Game On, Cougars! was a hit with gaming enthusiasts.

    This year, UH Libraries partnered with FoodMachine Houston to hold a food drive during Game On, Cougars! benefiting the Houston Food Bank. Attendees contributed over $1600 in food items and cash donations. The group also taught board games, ran raffles, and managed Warmachine miniatures.

    Members of Houston Pathfinder Society also attended, and gave participants tutorials on role-playing games. Several organizations donated games for play at the event, and game stores were also on hand to run demos and sell games, including Ettin Games.

    Game On, Cougars! is hosted as part of International Games Day @ Your Library, an initiative of the American Library Association that encourages communities to connect with their libraries through the educational, recreational and social value of games.

    View photos from Game On, Cougars! 2014.

    Posted on November 21st, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off
    New Collection Portrays Houston’s Architectural Domain

    Architectural photographer Joe Aker has given a collection of images to the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections.

    The Aker Architectural Photographic Records Collection comprises roughly 50,000 distinct images depicting scenes of commercial architecture over the past three decades.

    SOM 450 Lexington, New York City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    SOM 450 Lexington, New York City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Aker, owner of Aker Imaging, has worked with leading architecture and real estate firms, such as Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Robert A.M. Stern, César Pelli, Pickard Chilton, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Philip Johnson, HOK, Kirksey and Ziegler Cooper; as well as Gerald D. Hines Interests and Trammell Crow.

    Of particular interest are images of properties developed by Gerald D. Hines, for which the University of Houston College of Architecture is named. It is one of the largest collections of photographs of his buildings completed in the twentieth century.

    In 2011, Aker began considering the future for his vast collection of photography. He contacted UH Special Collections, whose mission is to preserve, safeguard, organize, and describe primary sources in a number of collecting areas for teaching and research activities of students and scholars.

    The Aker collection offers a rare view of the architectural landscape in Houston and other major cities, including a photographic record of original models of structures that were never built, as well as plans, renderings, models and final photography of the finished buildings. What makes this collection of images special are the many photographs showing the process of design from the first drawing of the first model to the final design model and the finished building.

    Composite of Hines Del Bosque, Mexico City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Composite of Hines Del Bosque, Mexico City. Image courtesy of Joe Aker.

    Aker was one of the first to digitally produce structural model composites before the advent of computer-generated graphics. Working with Houston digital artist Raphaele Malandain, he would photograph a site where a building was set to be constructed, photograph the building model, and drop the model image onto the site image using analog film composition, resulting in a close representation of the future finished building.

    As a whole, Aker says, the collection tells a fascinating story of Houston’s economic booms and busts. For more information on this new and growing collection, contact Vince Lee.

    Posted on November 21st, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | 1 Comment »
    UH Libraries Hosts Bake Sale for Charity
    University of Houston Libraries Bundt Cakes for Charity

    Proceeds from Bundt Cakes for Charity benefited Education Foundation of Harris County.

    In honor of National Bundt Cake Day and National Philanthropy Day last week, University of Houston Libraries held a bake sale to raise funds for a local organization.

    The Education Foundation of Harris County supports innovative learning programs for the 800,000+ K-12 public education students in the greater Houston region, and provides training for teachers leading science, technology, engineering and math after-school programs.

    UH librarians and staff baked, prepped and sold a variety of sweet treats in the MD Anderson Library and University Center, and in just a few hours, raised over $500 for the Education Foundation of Harris County.

    The Bundt Cakes for Charity bake sale was made possible by the Libraries’ microgrant program, an initiative designed to foster new and innovative ideas by librarians and library staff that support the Libraries’ strategic directions.

    Posted on November 20th, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off
    Dog Days of December: Paws and Relax at UH

    As finals approach, the University of Houston Libraries is partnering with a local organization to bring therapy dogs back to campus for a fun and stress-free study break.

    Certified therapy dogs of Faithful Paws will arrive at the MD Anderson Library for four days in December. UH students are encouraged to stop by for petting, snuggling and treat-feeding with gentle and friendly canines.

    paws_fall14

    Location: rooms 106P and 106T in the MD Anderson Library

    December 8: 8:00 – 10:00 p.m. (concurrent with Finals Mania)

    December 9: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    December 10: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    December 11: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

    View photos from Spring 2014 Paws and Relax.

    Posted on November 19th, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Student Success | Comments Off
    UH Students Produce Game On, Cougars! Radio Ad

    Game On, Cougars! 2014 is just a few weeks away, and to help promote the event, a group of University of Houston students produced a radio ad that will run on the student-led CoogRadio through November 15.

    The students, Will Hedgecock, Bonnie Langthorn, and Jacob Mangum provided creative talent with scriptwriting and voice acting for the spot. Music Library coordinator Stephanie Lewin-Lane directed and mixed the recording, and provided voiceover.

    Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

    Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, MD Anderson Library Learning Commons

    The radio ad was recorded at the Hamill Foundation Multimedia Studio, located in the MD Anderson Library and open for use by all UH students.

    Listen to the Game On, Cougars! 2014 radio ad:

    Music titled Monkeys Spinning Monkeys provided by Kevin MacLeod at incompetech.com

    Posted on October 22nd, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off
    Unique Holdings at University of Houston Libraries

    University of Houston Libraries invites faculty, students, researchers and anyone interested in discovering rare literary treasures to attend a brown bag lecture on Wednesday, October 29 in the Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavilion at the MD Anderson Library.

    Fables in Slang | George Ade | from UH Special Collections

    Fables in Slang | George Ade | from UH Special Collections. Part of The Last Untapped Resource in Houston brown bag lecture.

    English librarian Dr. Jesse Sharpe and library specialist Kristine Greive will present “The Last Untapped Resource in Houston,” a discussion of unique works of literature housed in UH Special Collections.

    The October 29 lecture is the first installment of Unique Holdings, a new series that highlights the rare archival items held by Special Collections and available for use by faculty, students and researchers.

    Future Unique Holdings talks will feature liaison librarians discussing other books and manuscripts of Special Collections that can inform and shape scholarly endeavors in any discipline.

    Bring your lunch and enjoy an enlightening discussion!

    What: “The Last Untapped Resource in Houston” brown bag lecture
    When: Wednesday, October 29 at noon
    Where: Elizabeth D. Rockwell Pavilion, MD Anderson Library

    Posted on October 14th, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off
    UH Libraries + Games = Student Success

    Last year, over 130 gaming enthusiasts gathered at the University of Houston Libraries for the first-ever Game On, Cougars!, a day of open gaming for the UH community. This year, the event levels up with a legendary alliance for an even more epic experience.

    UH students are invited to Game On, Cougars! 2014

    UH students are invited to Game On, Cougars! 2014

    FoodMachine Houston, a non-profit organization comprising gamers whose mission is to make a positive impact on the community through charitable acts of gaming, will be volunteering alongside UH Libraries staff at this year’s event on Saturday, November 15 at the MD Anderson Library Rockwell Pavilion. The group will teach board games, run raffles, and manage Warmachine miniatures and video game tournaments for UH attendees, and accept donations for the Houston Food Bank as well.

    FoodMachine Houston

    FoodMachine Houston

    “We are thrilled to be working collaboratively with FoodMachine Houston on the planning and running of Game On, Cougars!, and we expect that it will be at least twice as big as last year’s event,” said Rachel Vacek, head of Web Services and co-chair of the event.

    Houston Pathfinder Society will also be attending to give participants a crash course on role-playing games. Game developers will also showcase prototypes in need of play-testers, and vendors will display merchandise. Attendees will have plenty of chances to win prizes, too.

    Beyond a fun day of gaming at the UH Libraries, Game On, Cougars! is also designed to promote student success, which “is about helping students acquire the skills they need to become lifelong learners and be successful both in college and on the path they have chosen after graduation,” Vacek, an avid gamer herself, said. “I believe that playing games – whether board games, video games, or role-playing games – strengthens social bonds and builds trust between people. Games also encourage players to find innovative solutions, teach them how to persevere through challenges, and collaborate effectively to reach shared goals. Many games require critical thinking and problem solving skills. All these benefits of gaming translate into having better study skills and more effective interactions within the classroom and beyond.”

    Game On, Cougars! is hosted in conjunction with hundreds of libraries around the globe in celebration of International Games Day @ Your Library, an initiative of the American Library Association. Sponsorship opportunities are available for Houston-based developers, publishers and sellers.

    Who: You! All UH students, staff and faculty are invited to attend.
    What: A FREE day of board games, card games, war games, miniatures, role-playing games, and video games; prizes, refreshments and more!
    When: Saturday, November 15, 2014
    Where: MD Anderson Library Rockwell Pavilion

    Posted on September 25th, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements, Special Event or Display, Student Success | Comments Off
    Social Media Week at UH Libraries

    University of Houston Libraries will host a special week of social media training in October for UH students, staff and faculty.

    Sign up for workshops on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more during Social Media Week at UH Libraries.

    Sign up for workshops on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and more during Social Media Week at UH Libraries.

    Jessica Brand, UH social media manager, will teach workshops on various social media platforms in the MD Anderson Library Learning Commons from October 6 – 10.

    As with the UH Libraries technology training workshops, Social Media Week workshops are free and are recommended for anyone who uses social media.

    Topics include:

    Facebook 101

    • Understand the differences between a Facebook profile, page, and group
    • Review personal profile privacy settings and options
    • Learn how to make and maintain a Facebook page

    Facebook Analytics: Advanced 102

    • Understanding Facebook Insights
    • How to make a Facebook page monthly report

    Twitter 101

    • How to grow your Twitter presence
    • How to make and use Twitter lists
    • Understanding hashtags

    Twitter and Hootsuite: Advanced 102

    • Introduction to Hootsuite
    • Monitoring topics and keywords on Twitter
    • Introduction to Twitter analytics

    LinkedIn 101

    • How to create an awesome profile
    • How to use LinkedIn Groups

    Instagram and Snapchat 101 *This class requires all attendees to bring their own smart phone or other device with app store and built-in camera.*

    • Get to know Instagram
    • Get to know Snapchat

    View the full schedule for Social Media Week and register online.

    Posted on September 23rd, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off
    Challenged Comic Books and Graphic Novels

    This week marks the annual Banned Books Week, a national campaign that highlights the importance of free and open access to information, and calls attention to literary works that are frequently challenged in bookstores, libraries and schools. This year’s Banned Books Week theme focuses on challenged comic books and graphic novels.

    Dan Johnson, senior library specialist at the University of Houston Libraries and Association of Research Libraries/Society of American Archivists Mosaic Program fellow, has incorporated his longtime interest in comic books and graphic novels into his scholarly endeavors, having researched and written on a range of topics, from Neil Gaiman’s Sandman to the works of Robert Crumb.

    Below, Johnson discusses issues of banned and challenged comic books and graphic novels, and implications for public libraries and the community.


    Comic Book Legal Defense Fund
    The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) is a non-profit organization comprised of comic book creators, publishers and readers who come to the defense of comic book shops or libraries that have problems with materials being challenged. Some of them end up having issues where a challenged book is accused of violating community standards.

    CBLDF compiled a list of comic books and graphic novels that are constantly in the news, or are known for having challenge or ban issues. In almost all cases they weren’t actively banned, but there were challenge cases for them, usually about age appropriateness. Within public libraries, most make a distinction between graphic novels for adults in one section, graphic novels for teens in another, and graphic novels for younger children in a third section. Often a challenge comes up when a teen or younger child comes home with a book that they got from the adult fiction section.

    Addressing the Challenge
    In public libraries, there’s a formal review process documented by that library so that the public has access to it and they know what’s going to happen. It requires the person making the challenge to have read the book in toto. That does away with a lot of the challenges because many people haven’t read the whole book.

    When they have read the book completely, the challenge goes through an internal review process that involves librarians of that particular institution. The review panel reads the book from beginning to end, where the issue is to determine whether there is some artistic merit or value to this book as literature. These are stories that reflect different community standards, different people’s lives, and different people’s experiences.

    As a result of the challenge, the book in question can be pulled completely. That doesn’t happen very often, but it can happen. Second, the book could be re-categorized; they move it from the young adult fiction section to the adult fiction section, for example. The third possible ruling is that the review board determines that the book is appropriate for the library and falls within the scope of their collection development policy. The last step in the review process, after the board comes to an agreement, is that they write a defense letter, stating what they have determined to do and why.

    Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Bibliotherapy
    I am a parent, and there are all sorts of comic books that I read, but I won’t let my daughter read. I think parents should assess what they’re willing to talk to their children about. Literature can be used as a way to explore things that are challenging or scary for children. One of the ways to work through things that they don’t understand is to read about them in a safe environment. An idea that has been brought up in my classes in graphic novels and library science is that, if you think that it could happen to someone, it has happened to someone. There are readers out there who are looking for books that speak to their experiences. If you can imagine that anyone has gone through it, you should have materials for them to read. That’s the case for literature, and one of the things that comic books and graphic novels are good for. There’s a term for it – bibliotherapy – the idea that a book as a fictional piece is a safe environment in which to explore traumatic things that have happened.

    Selected Challenged Works

    Sandman by Neil Gaiman and various artists

    Sandman by Neil Gaiman and various artists

    Sandman by Neil Gaiman and various artists
    Following the events that occur when Morpheus, the Sandman and Lord of Dreams, is captured and imprisoned by mistake by a dark magician, this series of graphic novels blends characters from world religions, mythology, and literature in an epic tale. Ambitious in scope, Gaiman’s creation is a high watermark for the comics format, having won various awards including a Hugo and numerous Eisners.

    Maus by Art Spiegelman
    Spiegelman’s autobiographical tale interweaves the story of his father, Vladek, a Jewish Holocaust survivor from occupied Poland, and Artie’s challenges in making sense of his father’s tale. In Spiegelman’s Pulitzer-winning narrative, Jews are depicted as mice, Germans as cats, and U.S. GIs as dogs in a very emotional story of survival during World War II.

    Fun Home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

    Fun Home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

    Fun Home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel 
    This graphic novel memoir explores the complexities of family life of lesbian author Bechdel and her distant relationship with her father, a man who spent most of his life in the closet. Ever an enigma full of contradictions, even in his death his intentions are unclear; what might have been an accident could easily have been suicide. Bechdel was recently named as a 2014 MacArthur Foundation fellowship recipient.


    Posted on September 23rd, 2014 by Esmeralda Fisher and filed under Announcements | Comments Off